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So, here's the thing, I was unemployed for a several months after graduation, and shortly after, I was offered with 2 jobs position (both office location are really far away from each other, company A in capital city, company B in country-side).

First, both companies, let's say company A and B, offers medium salary, and because company A approach me first, with no hesitation I accept the offer, and I like both company job desk.

One month has passed, and suddenly company B called back and raised up their salary offer above my expectation, literally, I am tempted to resign from my current employer (company A) but have no idea on how to communicate it with the company.

Professionally speaking, what should I say to the company HR regarding this matter? Without me sounding like an ungrateful employee, given I'm still just an 'fresh graduate'. (note: I was given the opt to 'one month notice')

Addition:

Also, do I have to give some sort of email notice (when I leave) to all employee (company A only have a handful of employee, so I know most of them in just a short time) or just a few colleagues I'm close to?

Company A has taken liberty to pardon my absence (for 3 days) when it's should be my first day working, because of family issues, I feel grateful for this.

Company B has called me in my first week working at company A, asking about their offer, and I refused the offer back then, but they called back again.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Jan Doggen, Reinstate Monica, Chris E, IDrinkandIKnowThings Nov 25 '14 at 16:28

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Several things come to mind here

  1. You owe neither company anything. Simply giving you a job is no requirement for loyalty, unless they've gone above and beyond the norm for you
  2. Do you have a probation period at your current job? Remember that it works both ways - it's not just for them to evaluate you. If you find a better fit in the short term, take it - they likely wouldn't hesitate to drop you if they felt you weren't a good fit
  3. Have you taken relative salary into account? If Company B pays twice as much but is in the city and everything there costs twice as much, you're earning the same. Compare your bills/costs to your salary.
  4. Make your decision independent of your old company. I strongly recommend NOT going back to Company A and asking them to compete with the newly offered salary - even if they gave you the raise, they will likely see you as being likely to leave later for other higher offers, or may even believe that you looked for a better offer in order to force your salary up. Decide for yourself, and simply inform the relevant parties of your decision
  5. Remember the future impact on your career - explaining a short employment can be tricky, especially if the only reason is "the new job paid more" - you don't want to appear mercenary. If you only worked for Company A for a very short time, you could merely leave it off your CV/Resume, but then you can't claim that experience. If possible, tie it to personal reasons - "I found the commute was too long and I was isolated from my friends, my new job in the city was much closer to my friends and home, which improved my work/life balance"
  • 1. well, in my supposed-to-be first day working, I asked for a 3 days leave to company due to a family problem, and the company A approved it. Does it count? 2. yes, a 6 months probation period, with one month notice if I'm leaving 3. company B is in country-side :) 4. I think so too 5. the truth is, there's another personal reason that I feel would be too much to be shared here, but thanks for the input – Abie Giordano Nov 26 '14 at 2:30
  • 1. is nice, but not demanding of loyalty - family problems are family problems, I'd see it as a bad thing if they didn't! 2. Well remember it goes both ways. 3. Sounds like B is likely doubly-good economically and skipping 4, 5. If you've got good financial reasons AND personal reasons, few people would blame you for moving – Jon Story Nov 26 '14 at 10:13
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One month has passed, and suddenly company B called back and raised up their salary offer above my expectation, literally, I am tempted to resign from my current employer (company A) but have no idea on how to communicate it with the company.

Professionally speaking, what should I say to the company HR regarding this matter? without me sounding like an ungrateful employee, given I'm still just an 'fresh graduate'. (note: I was given the opt to 'one month notice')

If you have already decided to leave, there should be no dilemma here.

  • Make sure you get your offer from Company B in writing first
  • Go to Company A, and explain that you appreciate having worked there, but you got another offer that you couldn't afford to refuse
  • Indicate that you of course will work through the notice period
  • Accept Company B's offer, and give them the appropriate start date

You are basically telling Company A that you are leaving for more money. If you convey your thanks for the job (even though it didn't last long), you should be able to communicate it professionally.

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Contact Company B and explain the entire situation in general terms, not mentioning the specific name of Company A, where you are currently employed. Ask them if they can solidify their offer to you in writing, including salary and duties, and stipulating that they will hold your new position for one month so that you can be fair to your current employer .
With that document in hand, go talk to the HR person for Company A. Open the conversation with something like...

"I would like to discuss this document with you." Then let them read it.

The conversation should pretty much run itself from there.

  • first of all, thank you for the answer, second, wouldn't it come across as rude just handing over the said document? – Abie Giordano Nov 25 '14 at 8:03
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    It's direct. Personally, I'd be slightly less direct about it ("I've had an offer from another company at significantly greater salary than I'm currently on"), but the bottom line is that you're considering leaving which is going to have to be a direct conversation at some point. – Philip Kendall Nov 25 '14 at 9:04
  • all right, got your point – Abie Giordano Nov 26 '14 at 2:23
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I agree with Joe but i would like to add something.

The change is purely economical? Is location and/or knowledge of Company B better? If you really want to change there is nothing wrong with it, but keep in mind that you shouldn't be changing from work to work. If you are content now I would say you don't quit just for some extra money.

Personally, after I start at a new place, I stick for at least 1 year until I have learned what I liked/disliked from it. But as I said, there is nothing wrong with changing if that is what you really want.

  • not only economical, company B is in country-side and closer to home, but both company will enable me to learn different, new things which I think both is profitable for my hard/soft skill – Abie Giordano Nov 26 '14 at 2:25

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