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There are a lot of major organisations like Linux, Oracle, Cisco, etc. that offer certification for completing a course. However, there are technologies for which there is no standard certification.

For example, Android programming has no standard certification by any major organisation. There are, however, many private organisations that offer certifications under their own name.

How credible are these certifications when it comes to getting hired?

Personally, I spend time reading books and developing a portfolio than in these certifications because no matter how extensive the course, books generally tend to cover more topics than can be taught in a course.

Edit:
For example, if I am applying for the job of an Android developer, how credible is a non-standard cert as a proof of knowledge?

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An Android cert may certify that you have the Android syntax down. It does not certify that you can code anything in Android let alone build an app in Android. Since good software developers are first of all good problem solvers, the Android cert does not say a damn thing about your ability to conceptualize problems let alone solve them. If you are a poor problem solver - and there are a lot of software developers out there who are poor problem solvers - then I do expect that your code will all too accurately reflect your poor problem solving ability. Guaranteed.

  1. Personally, I'd ignore the cert and stare at your portfolio - I want to know that the way you code won't drive me crazy.

  2. Once you have a couple of apps you can point to, your next task is to prepare for the Android interview questions. Google for "Android interview questions".

  3. Then prepare for the interview coding session. I suggest www.coderbyte.com as one source. I am fairly sure that there are other sites that give you Android interview coding challenges that are more customized to Android. Google for them, too.

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  • I was trying to keep it general. I am still on the learning curve. I am sure there are other technologies, too, that do not have standard certifications. :) – Little Child Dec 7 '14 at 5:57
  • @LittleChild I don't trust computer language certifications - knowing the syntax certifies that the one who passed the exam qualifies as a code monkey. Passing the exam does not say anything about how talented the person is as a programmer and how disciplined the person is as a software engineer. – Vietnhi Phuvan Dec 7 '14 at 6:04
  • I don't trust most certifications either - For example, there are three kinds of answers in any Cisco exam: the right answer, the wrong answer and the Cisco answer. You don't pass the exam if you don't know the Cisco answers. Cisco's idea of making an exam is setting up linguistic traps all over the place. – Vietnhi Phuvan Dec 7 '14 at 6:21
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    @LittleChild Build up your portfolio. Build up a couple of Android apps. Nothing super complicated. – Vietnhi Phuvan Dec 7 '14 at 7:19
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    @LittleChild Good :) I do full stack Javascript but I find Python much more rewarding because of its power, flexibility and scope of applicability :) – Vietnhi Phuvan Dec 7 '14 at 11:13

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