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Why technical interviews are done on the board? I find it very stupid that they ask you for example to write a function that sums up the integers from a file, and to do that on the whiteboard and have no syntax errors. But I find it impossible, I means how on earth I can remember that a Reader object has a the method name readLine() instead of nextLine()??! These stuff are hard to remember! So what are they looking for when they ask such questions?!

closed as off-topic by Chris E, gnat, Justin Cave, enderland Dec 11 '14 at 18:36

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    Similar, possibly even a duplicate. – mkennedy Dec 11 '14 at 18:02
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    Are you sure they expect no syntax errors? Commands I use a lot I have memorized. – paparazzo Dec 11 '14 at 18:02
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    you may find this enlightening: programmers.stackexchange.com/a/16799/285 – Kate Gregory Dec 11 '14 at 18:59
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    Why would you think this is hard to remember? Competent professionals in every field know the basics without having to look things up. I know all the basic SQL syntax and probably about 85% of the advanced syntax without having to look it up. I know the database structure (hundreds of tables and thousands of stored procs) and what is stored where for literally thousands of pieces of data without having to look it up. Why wouldn't I expect other professionals to have the same level of knowledge in their field. This isn't school, it's work and we need you to know your profession not look it up. – HLGEM Dec 11 '14 at 20:33
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What would you rather do that can be done to test someone's communication skills? Having laptops with all the software a developer could use would be quite unrealistic and so the idea is to have something that is rather simple which should be doable to see how well do you communicate on some points, what do you assume on other points. For example, did you ask if you could have typos in the code? Did you tell them you'd likely have IntelliSense or other checking mechanisms to ensure the code would compile? In a way, the whiteboard test has more than a few potholes that are designed to see whether or not you'd hit them and if so what do you do about it. At least this would be my understanding after doing probably about 70 of them in the past 17 years.

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