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I recently got hired in a company as an information security specialist who should find vulnerabilities and send recommendations to the IT team so they can fix it.

X is a member of the IT Team and he is the only responsible for Networking which makes him my only interface to do changes in the network so he is the only one who can give network architectures and other stuff, But X is an arrogant person who wants to always feel superior because of his experience in the enterprise and he doesn't want to accept recommendations from anyone, especially from the young fresh recruit.

  • although i talk to him nicely , he always reject me and says that i don't know nothing
  • He once told me after a meeting "you should understand what i am saying not me understanding what you say"
  • when i sent my first mail to get access to a platform he initiated a stupid discussion with me to get on my nerves

my superior (who is a nice woman) says that he is nice guy but he always do this and we should accept him as he is and talk to him carefully. I am capable of attacking him when he does this but as a new recruit i don't want to make trouble.

I want to find a solution with a minimum damage.I think that either i go hard on him when he does this or i be nice to him till i get the information that i want. what is the best solution ?

Edit

i think that everybody here thinks that i am a young kid that doesn't know a thing about professionalism. I have one year of work experience and i know a lot about co-workers relations. As i said this man doesn't only do this to me but to my boss (the information security officer) too and to all other workers who want need something from him so don't try to put the blame on me, i am the one who need help here not him !

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    Have you considered that your coworker might not want to cooperate because you don't actually know what you're talking about? There are certainly stubborn fief-lords in IT, but just as common is the new hire who comes in thinking they know everything. – Telastyn Dec 31 '14 at 15:12
  • In many occasions he tells me that i am wrong but when reporting to my superior we find out that i am right and he was very fast in his answer. I talk about situations where he even says that he already provided me the answers but he really didn't – Snake Hernandez Dec 31 '14 at 15:33
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    The phrasing you used such as "he is the only one who can give network architectures and other stuff" implies that Telastyn is pretty close to the mark. – NotMe Jan 1 '15 at 20:39
  • "when i sent my first mail to get access to a platform" Employees requesting inappropriate access to things is a pretty major red flag for any administrator. It almost sounds like you are doing a phishing security test and the guy is passing just fine. – trognanders Jan 25 at 8:15
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should find vulnerabilities and send recommendations to the IT team so they can fix it.

I suggest you do exactly what you were hired for. You were not hired as anyone's boss, so don't try to tell people what to do. For each vulnerability you find, prepare a report, gather the details so you can prove there actually is a vulnerability and recommend a fix.

It's not your job to have people implement your fix. The IT team has a boss and it's his job to take your recommendation and weight risk versus cost. Then and only then the boss will give your coworker a task to actually do as you say. Or not. That's a business decision for someone wearing a suit. With the report sent and noticed, your job is done.

People may come off as arrogant and unwilling to cooperate because you are new, you are criticising their prior work as insecure and you try to give them more work. If they do work directly received through you, they get into trouble with their boss, because the work he gave them will be late because they did what you said instead. Good workers don't want to get into trouble with their boss.

Once you have gained enough trust in around the people in your company, they will be going over the head of their respective bosses because they know you are right. But that takes a lot of professional and personal trust that has to be earned by years of good work. You are not there yet. You will have to take the normal route, no shortcuts. Do what you were hired for. Report the vulnerabilities and let the suits decide on the consequences.

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    i actually need his help for investigation and network information and i should go to him when i need to find something so this will make me in need of his help but he is always rejecting me when i ask questions and he wants to make you look very awful. – Snake Hernandez Jan 2 '15 at 23:55
  • i think that everybody here thinks that i am a young kid that doesn't know a thing about professionalism. I have one year in work exeperience and i know a lot about co-workers relations. As i said this man doesn't only do this to me but to my boss (the information security officer) too and to all other workers who want need something from him so don't try to put the balme on me, i am the one who need help here not him ! – Snake Hernandez Jan 2 '15 at 23:59
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    With one year work experience, you are like you passed your first year in grammar school. Yes, you have experience. Chances are, all other people have more. Document all cases where he is uncooperative. Make sure you cannot be blamed when something goes wrong because you asked him in writing. If he does it to all people, this problem will be solved. You only need to make sure you don't get burned when he goes down. Document. Document. Document. And be nice and professional to all others so it's obvious it's him, not you. – nvoigt Jan 3 '15 at 12:38
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There are always going to be co-workers who are difficult to get along with. You need to treat them with the same respect and kindness and professionalism as the ones you like. A co-worker should not be able to tell that you dislike them. Your boss is correct, listen to her.

There are very few circumstances at work where attacking someone verbally or otherwise is a good idea. This is not one of them. It worrys me franky that you even considered this as a possible action.

Since the network is his responsibilty not yours, it is NOT arrogant for him to make decisions without your input or decide to do things other than what you would like. Consider that he has to consider many things you probably do not when you make recommendations because this is not your specialty. If anything goes wrong, he is the one in hot water not you.

If I were you, I would find the vunerabilities and document them and let him come up with the fixes. I would also sit down with him and talk to him about what he sees as the problmes that he wishes would get visibility so he could get the time or money to fix them. Make him an ally not an enemy.

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    When this person doesn't follow my recommendations i will be the one in trouble in case of a cyberattack. FYI i have already implemented some processes and the IT team including his superior accepted my requirements , i only find problems with him – Snake Hernandez Dec 31 '14 at 15:41
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    as i mentioned, he made me his enemy but i am trying to make peace with him, i even once drank coffee with him and asked him things about networking and listened to his answers to prove him that i listen to him and respect his experience – Snake Hernandez Dec 31 '14 at 15:47
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    First: Try to sit togheter with him in an undisturbed environment and bring your recommendations with you. Then discuss possible solutions (not ones you come with premade before the meeting) and accept his solutions. Second: Try to understand his position: He is in trouble when the network has problems. It works now but then someone comes and likes to change it and doesn't consider important things (which you might not know about). – sweet home Dec 31 '14 at 16:25
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    So would you in his position listen to a new person who has much less experience with the system which is working now but which might change with the changes and might cost his job when the changes cause trouble? (He might say the changes were your idea and you are to blame because of the troubles but he will be questioned why he didn't stop you and it also looks unprofessional). – sweet home Dec 31 '14 at 16:25
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    Third: Make sure, you understand point 2 before you make the meeting. – sweet home Dec 31 '14 at 16:26

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