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I now am looking for a new job. I have my resume posted on sites like dice, monster and so on. This resume contains all my details: contact info, technical skills, working history and education. It omits irrelevant information like gender, age, race, etc. Of course, my resume is current, describing my present job situation. I was really surprised to receive a lot of emails from recruiters, where they described positions that 100% match with me. These recruiters asked me to send an updated resume - but they didn't provide any details about what appeared out of date. What do they want to see in an updated resume?

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    If your resume is already up to date as-is, why don't you TELL them that it's already updated? – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 2 '15 at 23:15
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    I think you're over thinking it. The recruiter will usually have no way of telling if the resume is up to date, so they will just automatically ask to be safe. If it's current just say so, it won't be an issue. – The Wandering Dev Manager Jan 3 '15 at 0:53
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    Most people don't update their resume until they are looking for another job, so the only resume they have is the one from their previous job search. The recruiter wants one that includes your current position and experience. However, anyone who says that they have 100% match is wrong. The only job you're 100% matched with is the one you already have. Any job that doesn't require you to grow your skill set is one you'll be bored with quickly. Look for jobs where you're an 85% or 90% match. Those are the ones worth pursuing. – Wesley Long Jan 3 '15 at 18:49
  • I posted a full answer below but here is the shorthand answer: Pick a number from 1 to 18. If you guess the number correctly I have a mind blowingly great job for you! But be careful and choose the right number! Pick wrong and I will have to share this fantastic opportunity with someone else! ;) – JakeGould Jan 3 '15 at 18:50
  • In my experience, 99% cases where a "middleman" recruiter asks for an updated resume, they are just "following a template". You see, there are the so-called "active" and "passive" job-seekers. The active job-seekers probably update their resume every week or more often, but once you land a job, you become "passive" and updating resume becomes less of a priority. The recruiter, of course, has to send maximum people through the door, and will try to contact both categories. They need an updated resume from "passive" job-seekers, and make their life simple by asking it of "active" job-seekers. – Masked Man Jan 4 '15 at 16:38
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There are a couple of possibilities that come to mind here:

  1. Time difference between posted resume and now - If you put your resume up a few months ago, there may be new details to update in your resume that could be worth adding that aren't in the resume you posted on-line way back when. Some recruiters may want to know if there is something more recent you could send them. There are times where I've had a posted resume that is more than a month old and so I could imagine someone wanting something more recent as reasonable.

  2. Resume customized for a specific position - Sometimes you could customize your resume for a position by being selective in the achievements of your experience since some may be more relevant than others. In this case, it is about a specific position that may be a great match if you know to update your resume for this specific position.

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I was really surprised to receive a lot of emails from recruiters, where they described positions that 100% match with me.

You should be surprised. Because that never happens when someone who really has a position for you contacts you. Meaning, they are puffing up your ego. Why? Read on.

These recruiters asked me to send an updated resume - but they didn't provide any details about what appeared out of date. What do they want to see in an updated resume?

The fact they are asking for an “updated” resume immediately after stating you are a “perfect fit” should sound alarms off in your head.

The reality is they want some kind of direct contact from you to continue the “conversation” with you. Also, recruiters are basically cattle herders. So by puffing up your ego in one line and then placing implied doubt in the next line is their way of gaming you.

Another aspect of this is some agencies have tools that monitor resume sites and then act on your data. Meaning if you make one simple change to your resume, their system flags it and then that might trigger an e-mail being sent to you.

In general you should always look at cold contact from recruiters as what it is: A cold contact. If they have a gig you want, take a deep breath, put on your armor and try to deal with them. But from my experience of 20+ years in the tech world, anyone contacting you like this is a waste of time at best. And if you do contact them directly you might just end up on a “sucker” list where more sketchy recruiters will be contacting you with more “great” offers that are a “perfect fit.”

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    +1 - As a contractor I have a LOT of contact with recruiters and the ones who have a real, actual job and have actually read your CV can be spotted a mile off. The e-mail will be tailored, or more likely, they'll actually call you. The VAST majority (99.9%) of e-mails from recruiters are effectively SPAM. – Dan Jan 3 '15 at 18:53
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    "Because that never happens when someone who really has a position for you contacts you." Technically I have been contacted once about a job that was a 100% match for my skills - I knew that job was real and open because it was my old job. – Mel Reams Sep 28 '16 at 19:16

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