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Follow-up question to Lack of hours at work: address to the manager or not, and explaining in a job application.

My girlfriend has not had any hours with the company mentioned in the question above for 1.5 weeks now and just got a job offer. Furthermore, no communication has occurred between my girlfriend and her manager in that amount of time. My girlfriend will be starting this new job in a week (note: not two weeks) and will contact her manager tomorrow. I have two questions about how she should address her manager:

  • Would it be appropriate to address the manager by phone if my girlfriend hasn't been at work for 1.5 weeks?
  • Would it be appropriate to quit immediately without the one-week notice (i.e., without a one-week break before her next job)?

closed as off-topic by Jim G., Philipp, scaaahu, gnat, Chris E Jan 16 '15 at 11:41

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  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – Jim G., Philipp, Chris E
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    In the linked question, there was no written contract between your girlfriend and her manager. Your girlfriend can do whatever she likes, so can her manager. – scaaahu Jan 16 '15 at 8:49
  • Is this a Zero Hours contract/job ? – Pepone Jan 17 '15 at 19:09
  • @Pepone - If you look at the linked post, my gf was told that she would be getting ~12 hours/week. – Clarinetist Jan 17 '15 at 19:47
  • @Clarinetist yes I saw that but what type of contract was she on did it guarantee 12 hours work a week – Pepone Jan 18 '15 at 14:55
  • @Pepone - In the original post, there were no papers she signed, so I guess you could say there wasn't a contract other than what her employer promised verbally. – Clarinetist Jan 18 '15 at 17:25
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So let's see if I understand this correctly: Your girlfriend is officially employed. However, she doesn't get a monthly or weekly pay, but is paid per hour that she works, and in the last 1.5 weeks she hasn't been given any work, therefore hasn't received any income.

She could obviously give two weeks notice, but also notify the company that during the notice period she will not work more hours than in the week before the notice was given. Which would be zero hours.

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Quoting from your other post as background, to make sure that everybody is on the same page: "My girlfriend works for a small business which sells items. She started there two months ago and did not sign any papers. When she applied, she was told that she would be getting a 12-hour work week. However, her manager (the owner of the business) seems to randomly drop her hours in times in which there seems to be no demand (e.g., when there is bad weather, and no one probably will come by to buy anything). This has gotten to the point where the amount of hours my girlfriend worked in the last three weeks were 8, 6, and 3 hours respectively"

Given that her manager has been jerking her around ever since she started working for him, she doesn't owe him anything and that includes her notice. He hasn't done anything to deserve her respect and in my book, he should get none. If I were her, I'd start on the new job and I'd let him figure out that I am not available the next time he calls - I am not picking up the phone and he can talk to my answering machine for all I care. Those who treat me fairly get the two-week notice. Those who don't get what I feel like giving them - usually, nothing.

Once upon a time, I gave my two-week notice to a boss whom I knew to be unethical. While his underling promised to give me my accrued vacation - small reward for the 60-hour weeks I put in - his boss proceeded to cheat me of both the accrued vacation and my last two-week's pay. Not particularly funny considering that I had two dependents. My attitude is that her manager did not keep his word regarding her hours. He caused her financial hardship, disrupted her schedule and caused an awkward moment for her whenever she had to mention her reason for leaving at an interview, so screw him.

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    -1: In most jurisdictions and work contracts, the notice period is a legal obligation which must be fulfilled no matter how much you hate your boss. – Philipp Jan 16 '15 at 8:28
  • @Philipp: in the US almost all employees are at-will, meaning they can leave or be dismissed without notice. – kevin cline Jan 16 '15 at 9:41
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    @Phikioo Back up your claim. "From the OP's other post: "My girlfriend works for a small business which sells items. She started there two months ago and did not sign any papers. When she applied, she was told that she would be getting a 12-hour work week. However, her manager (the owner of the business) seems to randomly drop her hours in times in which there seems to be no demand (e.g., when there is bad weather, and no one probably will come by to buy anything). This has gotten to the point where the amount of hours my girlfriend worked in the last three weeks were 8, 6, and 3 hours" – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 16 '15 at 10:57
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    @Philipp avvo.com/legal-answers/… "Answer is no - no requirement by law to give two weeks' notice in New York State." So New York State is one place where you are making up your own set of facts. Again, she never signed any contract. – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 16 '15 at 11:09
  • @Philipp employees-lawyer.com/two-weeks-notice-requirements-california Answer is no - no requirement by law to give two weeks' notice in California. Again, you are making up your own set of facts. She never signed any contract. – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 16 '15 at 11:13

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