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A bit of background:

  • I'm in the software industry. 90% of the stuff I'm working on is/was completely new when I started in August 2014.

  • I need to make the same mistake two or three times before I can really learn from it. When I repeat a mistake, my manager usually lets me know ("we've discussed this before"). They're usually not 'serious' mistakes, just careless.

  • I'm proactive and I'm eager to do stuff, but since many of these things feel new to me I feel a bit left behind.

Some questions:

  • From your experience, do these kind of issues affect negatively my performance review?

  • Even if the above answer is 'no', this is affecting me personally because it annoys me. If the mistake is pointed out at me, or someone makes a suggestion about how to something better (e.g. changing something from manual to automated, basic stuff), I feel like screaming "why didn't I think of this?". How can I avoid these feelings?

  • Any ways of improving my learning speed?

closed as off-topic by JakeGould, gnat, Jan Doggen, Jim G., Garrison Neely Jan 22 '15 at 16:46

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on what to do are not practical answerable questions (e.g. "what job should I take?", or "what skills should I learn?"). Questions should get answers explaining why and how to make a decision, not advice on what to do. For more information, click here." – gnat, Jim G., Garrison Neely
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Take heart that its not just you. Even experienced developers have these "duh" moments; just have a look at thedailywtf.com – Burhan Khalid Jan 22 '15 at 4:31
  • Your question may be better suited for [Productivity.se], and even there, avoid asking for opinions to prevent close votes. – Jan Doggen Jan 22 '15 at 7:42
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From your experience, do these kind of issues affect negatively my performance review?

Absolutely.

How can I avoid these feelings?

Why would you want to? I mean, feeling upset that you missed something obvious or you made a mistake is how you're supposed to feel. That should provide motivation to do better in the future. To avoid feeling like you're not good, then you should do better. I mean, it seems obvious, but you should focus on solving the problem, not the symptom.

Any ways of improving my learning speed?

Maybe. There are people who say that this sort of thing can be improved with mental exercise, or better study/practice techniques. I am personally skeptical that you're going to make measurable strides in your ability to learn and retain skill.

But...

They're usually not 'serious' mistakes, just careless.

Are you sure that learning is your problem? If you're continually making stupid little mistakes, that's not a learning problem, that's a working problem. Being better at learning might be hard, but being better at working is easier in relation. Changing up the process that you use for the work, having someone double check things, cutting out distractions... there are a number of different approaches that I've seen work, though what will work for you is unknown.

  • I think its good that he wants to avoid those feelings. Because these feelings make life quality worse. This guy is already motivated to do better in the future, so motivation is not a problem I think, and so he does not need bad feelings. There might be various stress related deseases, if you will not try to live with as less stress as possible. Plus often happens that people who are stressed, angry, make other people stressed also which is again bad. – Will_create_nick_later Jul 29 '16 at 14:44
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From your experience, do these kind of issues affect negatively my performance review?

Yes. Those are exactly the kinds of things that lead to negative reviews. However, it's how you handle it and the progress you make towards correcting them that leads to positive reviews.

If the mistake is pointed out at me, or someone makes a suggestion about how to something better (e.g. changing something from manual to automated, basic stuff), I feel like screaming "why didn't I think of this?". How can I avoid these feelings?

We all experience times of self criticism / head banging. Instead of focusing on or even trying to avoid those the only solution I'm aware of is to just keep moving forward.

By saying you "started in August 2014" I'm guessing you mean that you started programming professionally then. Honestly, you are likely to continue having those "Why didn't I think of this?" moments daily for at least the next few years. Don't sweat it. The people you work with have them too whether they admit it or not. I've been in this since the stone age and I still have them.

You know you're making progress when you start looking back at your own work and curse the id10t that wrote it. This might help: http://thecodelesscode.com/case/116

Any ways of improving my learning speed?

Maybe. I write just about everything down, that helps me remember. Also, I create checklists when I can't remember all of the steps involved. For example:

  1. Check that it compiles
  2. Use Chrome to view source. Is the rendered source expected?
  3. Does the screen work like it should?
  4. Check it in.
  5. ....

The main thing here is to start developing habits for the various things you need to do in a day.

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I need to make the same mistake two or three times before I can really learn from it. When I repeat a mistake, my manager usually lets me know ("we've discussed this before"). They're usually not 'serious' mistakes, just careless.

If you are making the same mistake two or three times - this is not a sign of a learning problem, this is a sign of a working problem. That is, your work process is not helping you.

In addition, you admit they are careless. In other words, you could have easily avoided this, but you didn't ... twice, and now three times.

do these kind of issues affect negatively my performance review?

Put yourself in your manager's shoes. You have an employee who keeps repeating the same silly mistakes (this is your description); now it has come time to evaluate their performance. How would you rate the employee?

Ask yourself the following:

  1. Are you documenting these mistakes (and corrective actions)?
  2. Are you changing your process to catch these mistakes? (for example, updating the test scripts). Are you suggesting any changes?
  3. Are you checking your work?

All these show initiative to improve, which can go a long way towards a positive review.

0

Most of your question has already been addressed, so I'll address this last question of yours:

Any ways of improving my learning speed?

Use Anki. This single program has changed my life. Thanks to Anki I can recall information that I otherwise never would be able to recall. This goes doubly so for coding techniques, Linux commands, and the like which is import to remember quickly even though the situations in which you need it arises seldomly.

The below is copied from my answer on programmers.SE:

I put the most useful information that I come across in an Anki deck. Every morning I spend 5-10 minutes going over the material. Just this week, for instance, Anki asked me this question which I had not had to deal with for some time:

PHP: What must be done after a foreach on a referenced array?

I didn't remember if the answer was unset($value) or reset($value), so that kept me sharp. Sure enough, this very morning I had to use that in code.

I keep some snippets of information regarding AWS, PHP, Bash and other technologies that I use in there. At the very least, Anki keeps the info fresh in my mind or easy to find if I forget.

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