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A few months ago, I sat down and discussed with my boss for a pay raise. The company is small, so we rarely use papers to document these (For example, holiday application, etc). He agreed to it verbally, and promised that he would raise it after some time, which I cannot remember.

So the problem here is with me, failing to remember when I should get the pay raise. The only thing I can recall is it being in this year. I had thought that it would be in this month, but the recent pay slip proved otherwise.

How should I approach this? Should I ask my boss regarding this matter? If so, how do I properly word it?


Update:

So I got a hold of my boss today. I first asked him if he remembers about the issue, in which he did. When I asked when is it due to be effective, he was puzzled for a moment before saying, hasn't it taken effect?

We confirmed the details again, and I was told to send him a reminder regarding this matter, and he will follow up with me closely as soon as possible.

Thank you everyone!


Old question:

I was promised a pay raise a few months ago, but I can't seem to recall when I am supposed to receive it. Should I ask my boss about this?

  • You should provide more context to get a high quality answer (how did they "promise"?). Also, "Should I ask my boss about this" is soliciting a one-word answer. Do you want help in HOW to ask? Just commenting and not flagging to close for now since I'm thinking you can salvage this question. – Jared Jan 28 '15 at 5:32
  • @Jared, thanks for pointing it out. I have added more details. Is there anything else I can improve on? – user32312 Jan 28 '15 at 5:43
  • There's no one else you can ask. You seem certain that a promise for a raise was made, but you forgot a detail. Is there something about your relationship with your boss which makes you feel like you can't have a professional, respectful and tactful conversation on this subject? – user8365 Jan 28 '15 at 14:51
  • Of course, there's the unspoken lesson here - always back up a verbal discussion with at least an email confirming details between all involved parties. – HorusKol Jan 28 '15 at 22:59
  • @JeffO I suppose it is largely due to fear. For one, I have seen a number of outbursts from him, and it was not pleasant. – user32312 Jan 29 '15 at 0:43
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Tell your boss that both of you discussed the subject of a raise several months ago. Remind him that he agreed on that raise. Ask him when that raise is due to be effective. That's all there is to it.

  • as a thought, because the issue is about money, OP should consider bringing this up in-person, rather than over email/chat. – bharal Jan 28 '15 at 19:53
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    @bharal Compensation/benefits issues should always be brought up in person :) – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 28 '15 at 22:44
  • Agreeable. It will be a little difficult to try to get a hold of my boss, since he's always on the go, but I'll see what I can do. For the moment, I'll accept this answer. – user32312 Jan 29 '15 at 1:06
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You should simply ask your company. There is no reason to be shy or scared. You have the right to know if you are due for a raise.

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    I forgot something that was agreed upon with my boss. Impression-wise, wouldn't it be very negative? Which is why I asked on how should I properly word it to my boss too. – user32312 Jan 28 '15 at 7:40
  • It could be. But you could spin it in a positive manner. "I was so caught up in the project(s) I've been working on that it slipped my mind." This could also give you an opportunity to show how you've improved since then – Brian Jan 28 '15 at 16:40
  • @BrianRobbins that would be a great answer if the need arises, thanks! – user32312 Jan 29 '15 at 0:56
  • @user32312 and you lesson for the future is to write important stuff down (on paper or electronically as you prefer) at the time :) Even better, for something like this, write a brief email to your boss summarising the discussion - "We discussed my remuneration and agreed that I would get an increase of $x effective from y date" – Nigel Harper Jan 29 '15 at 11:55

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