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I would like apply for two different positions at the same company, that I can easily cover. Let's say that I am a mechanic and in my current job, and previous jobs, I repair(ed) motorbikes and cars. They are looking for a guy that can fix motorbikes(A) and for a guy that can fix cars(B).

I was thinking to write and mention on the resume A that I am good in repairing motorbikes, enhancing only my skills with motorbikes, and then writing the resume for the B position, enhancing only my skills with cars.

At the end, if you look at two resumes you will have a guy that he's an expert with motorbikes (but didn't mention any cars), and on the other hand a guy expert with cars (but didn't mention any motorbike).

Do you think the recruiters will think, looking at both resumes "is he working with motorbikes or cars?" and then would be lame? But I am working on both areas, so was thinking to enhance one on the first resume, and the other one on the second one.

Ofc it's a job in finance, but make easier to understand (maybe :D)

1

I'd use the same resume for both positions and go over my expertise in cars and motorcycles in the respective, targeted cover letters. My cover letters follow the following format:

Cover letter for motorcycles:

About me: I am expert in both motorcycles and cars. I have worked with cars and motorcycles and cars since 2005 and I have been an expert in motorcycles and cars since 2010. I hold a mechanic's license for both motorcycles and cars

About my technology stack: I can do this, this, and that wrt motorcycles. I am especially good with brakes.

What I want to do for you: be a key member of your team in delivering top notch customer service from interacting effectively and courteously with incoming customers to fixing their motorcycles in optimum time and cost to efficient post-sales servicing of their motorcycles.

Note: I am applying for both the motorcycle and the car mechanic positions. You may decide that you want someone who can do both.

Cover letter for cars:

About me: I am expert in both motorcycles and cars. I have worked with cars and motorcycles and cars since 2005 and I have been an expert in motorcycles and cars since 2010. I hold a mechanic's license for both motorcycles and cars

About my technology stack: I can do this, this, and that wrt cars. I am especially strong at carburetors ...

What I want to do for you: be a key member of your team in delivering top notch customer service from interacting effectively and courteously with incoming customers to fixing their cars in optimum time and cost to efficient post-sales servicing of their cars.

Note: I am applying for both the motorcycle and the car mechanic positions. You may decide that you want someone who can do both.

  • I would send to different and optimized cover letters, ofc but do you think is a bit lame then to send two different resume also? – conrad880 Jan 28 '15 at 12:27
  • @Zubair You are the one who knows best whether you are a master of none. I am a jack-of-all-trades - Infosec, systems engineering, software engineering - and I am pretty confident that you'd have a hard time beating me at any one of my trades :) – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 28 '15 at 18:58
  • @Vietnhi My apologies, it was not meant to be a personal attack, I am sure you are better at all of these than me, but I know about hiring. I am not saying you are not good at all the trades, but when you apply for a job it is all about "perception". If someone in the hiring role sees you have two different CVs they won't perceive you as being good at two things, but just at being "average" at two things – Zubair Jan 30 '15 at 8:21
  • Never repeat your resume in your cover letter! So why would you go over your experiences in your cover letter - that's where your resume is for. – Sjoerd Jul 21 '15 at 5:18
  • @Sjoerd In your resume, you list list and describe what you did. You don't necessarily explain what it is that you did that is relevant to the position that you are applying for. On top of that, the position may have requirements that are not covered in your resume descriptions - you may want to say that you acquired those requirements while working at XYZ. You did not necessarily get the experience required working at just one position either. You may have gotten part of the experience required by working at ABC, too (1/2) – Vietnhi Phuvan Jul 21 '15 at 9:48
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I like to think of your resume as an overall cover of what you are capable of and what you've learned; you don't know the skills unless they're listed in your resume and you don't have x amount of work experience unless it's listed there.

You can mention specifications in the application itself (the email, application form or the chat itself) if you think only a subset is relevant but you always include your awesome resume that shows what you are really capable of.

You want to be able to send your resume to 100 companies and it should be relevant everywhere, but of course every application is unique.

You wouldn't remove differentiation from your resume as a skill just because only integration was listed as a requirement for a job, but you can skip mentioning that knowledge in the application -- having more in your CV is better than not having enough, as long as it's well structured and not overwhelming.

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You may not be able to use two resumes/cover letters with some companies. Even small companies of a few hundred employees may use a web package to handle applications and other electronic documents for the hiring process.

In every case I have experienced recently they have limited you to one resume, one cover letter, one transcript. If the next day you attempt to apply for another position and you use the same profile/account to apply for the second position your new resume/cover letter will replace the previous one. I have tested this in the past by verifying that the first position I applied to did see the new documents.

It is possible that the recruiter or hiring manager could have copied your first set of documents to their hard drive and will use that version for the rest of the process. But you have no idea which job posting will be evaluated first. They might not do so in the order you applied.

You will have to tailor the resume and cover letter to show that you have experience in both areas. The alternative is to pick one position apply for it, wait until they hire you; if you are eliminated from the process then apply for the second one with the new documents. This has risks because the 2nd one may be filled before you can submit your application.

In many companies the two positions may be evaluated by unrelated teams even if they would work one desk apart. This mean that there is no way to know if any one person will see both applications, or even remember both applications unless they are either memorable or they read them very close together in time.

  • Also the famous ***vite works like that if you log-in with the same account? – conrad880 Jan 28 '15 at 11:41
-5

When you apply for a job it is all about "perception". If someone in the hiring role sees you have two different CVs they won't perceive you as being good at two things, but just at being "average" at two things. This is why you should not be applying to 2 different jobs in the same company.

You should only apply for one of the jobs and tailor your cover letter and CV only to that job. If I worked in the company and I happened across your other resume I would get confused and say no. Anyway, which is the job you will love? That is the one you should go for

  • Why -1? Is it for the quality of the answer or for the content – Zubair Jan 28 '15 at 11:26
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    The quality is based on the content. Somebody is not happy with the content. Or somebody doesn't like you. Or it's just random. They don't have to explain and in most cases they won't. So take your best guess. – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 28 '15 at 12:09
  • I wanted to know so that I could improve the answer, is that allowed? – Zubair Jan 28 '15 at 12:34
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    Most likely they didn't like your advice. Deciding not to apply for two positions because someone might get confused that you're qualified for both seems a little shortsighted to me. Effectively, you're reducing your chance of being hired. If you don't apply, you almost never get the job. – Daniel Jan 28 '15 at 17:43
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    this reads more like a comment, see How to Answer – gnat Jan 28 '15 at 17:43

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