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I'm currently composing my CV to apply for a graduate student position. Since I completed two degrees in parallel, my academic history is a bit nonlinear:

October 2011 — September 2015:     Subject₀
April 2012 — March 2015:     Subject₁

In a (reverse, i.e. most recent things on top) chronological CV, which of these should come first; that is, do I order them by start or end date? Both would make sense, and I have little to no experience with preparing resumes. Thank you for any advice.

  • Were these at the same college or university? Or were you simultaneously studying for two different degrees at two different institutions? – Justin Cave Jan 30 '15 at 2:58
  • They were at the same institution. – No Name Jan 30 '15 at 2:59
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    Most recent degree that was awarded is to be listed on on the top line. Older degree on the line below. Same as the sequence of your work experience - most recent work experience first. Stale news doesn't get top billing. – Vietnhi Phuvan Jan 30 '15 at 3:17
  • In the general case of no combinable tasks I would agree with vietnhi. However it sounds like you should combine as in the answer. ++ to both. – Nathan Cooper Jan 30 '15 at 14:02
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Since you got both degrees from the same institution and were studying for them at the same time, it would generally make sense to combine them in a single line

October 2011 - September 2015 University of North Hogwarts

Degrees in Underwater Basket Weaving and Defense Against the Dark Arts

Normally, no one would care that you were technically awarded one degree a few months before the other. And normally it would be hard to have different start dates since you were initially likely to be taking core classes that were needed for both degrees.

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    Where do you go to get a degree in Defense Against the Dark Arts? I want to go to that school. – HLGEM Jan 30 '15 at 18:27

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