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I'm an entry level C#/Java+Android developer and I cannot find a technical recruiting agency that will take on somebody at my level to match them with one of their clients. I have no idea how to find such an agency, Google has not been fruitful and I haven't found a question like this on this site.

closed as primarily opinion-based by jcmeloni, gnat, Jim G., IDrinkandIKnowThings, Garrison Neely Feb 23 '15 at 18:29

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Your question seems to be "How should an entry level candidate go about getting an interview call in an industry which is predominantly looking for experienced candidates?", and not just about such agencies. If this is correct, please edit the question accordingly, because as it is currently phrased, this would likely get closed as off-topic/primarily opinion-based. – Masked Man Feb 19 '15 at 3:45
  • PS: There might be other questions here which already address that, you might want to search around for a bit. – Masked Man Feb 19 '15 at 3:45
  • That's not correct, because I was specifically looking to go through recruiting agencies since I'm under the impression that they'd be much better at selling me, at this point. – Harry Tuttle Feb 19 '15 at 4:02
  • OK, that's it then. This question will most likely get closed by other users who have the privileges to do so. – Masked Man Feb 19 '15 at 4:22
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    It's not that there is no answer to the question, just that the question may not be suitable for this site. "How do I get an interview call if I am an entry level candidate?" is better suited to this site than "give me a list of recruiting agencies." See also: workplace.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic – Masked Man Feb 19 '15 at 5:18
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The answer to your question is "yes", there exists such recruiters. I've generally found them to be regional specialists, and the greatest amount of them exist in regions that are having a considerable imbalance between demand and supply and there are more positions than they can find qualified candidates for.

If you are in a region where there are more candidates than jobs in your field, then there may not be such a recruiter in your region. It may be worth it to check into a local university/college chapter of a professional organization, check into Meet-ups in your area, and if you have a proper LinkedIn account they'll be likely to come to find you.

But this is extraordinarily regional specific. In parts of Wisconsin, USA I've had head-hunters contacting me and offering me a free iPad for referrals when I replied I wasn't presently in the market for a job, and it was a legitimate recruiting agency. There are development cooperatives, domestic "in-sourcing" groups, many insurance companies are opening internships to recent graduates in addition to students and even considering not-so-recent-graduates for the trial-basis programs...

And in north-western parts of Wisconsin there weren't even recruiters available for experienced candidates, much less inexperienced ones. There is no global or nationwide superpower of recruitment, and Google isn't really your friend in this one - you need to meet individual people at networking and social events, most likely, to get the real word on the street on who's looking and who's worth talking to.

If you are in a region with little to no active recruiters, agencies, meetups, tech/IT social gatherings, events, professional organizations, etc - and all of these aren't open and helpful to someone for entry-level positions with previous documented experience...then you are probably just barking up the wrong tree, and looking for something that doesn't exist in your region. Back to looking for individual companies who potentially have openings, make sure you have LinkedIn professionally setup, have a nice resume with something to point to as "I created this", etc. General type of stuff.

If you don't have a college degree in the field, things will be harder. If you don't have a college degree at all, things will be considerably harder than that and most people report more luck in looking into smaller jobs with smaller companies and trying to build up experience and a professional personal network of people they know.

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