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I have at least two unemployed friends, and though they live near by, they're both depressed and won't come to my house to work on a mutually beneficial tech project.

I would like them to learn from myself and I would like to learn from them by means of collaboration that could hopefully lead to a new job for them, since they'd be able to show on their resumes that they are actually doing something, not just sitting around looking for jobs.

When I was last unemployed, I attended a hackerspace (video I made for the now famous Tony BUser who started the hackerspace in Reading), and worked on a project for an old college buddy that was starting his own magazine; eventually my sister got me a job at a magazine, which eventually led to a better more stable position.

I'd like to do the same thing for my two friends that my time at the hackerspace and working with my college buddy afforded me, but I don't know how to motivate them.

I have alot of computer equipment at my house and it's ripe for setting something up.

I've also noticed that it's difficult to get another geek to go in on a project in general unless they are working at a place of employment.

My friends are from sort of a rural area, and when I was unemployed I was living in a city.

How can I motivate these people to work towards something like this so they find gainful employment?

  • Maybe they aren't interested in that project? – o0'. Feb 24 '15 at 9:09
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It's all in how you sell it.

I would like them to learn from myself and I would like to learn from them by means of collaboration that could hopefully lead to a new job for them, since they'd be able to show on their resumes that they are actually doing something, not just sitting around looking for jobs.

Collaboration, building jobs skills, and working with fellow people on a project is looking for a job. You're not actively seeking, but you are actively building.

I've also noticed that it's difficult to get another geek to go in on a project in general unless they are working at a place of employment.

Have you considered not making just a hackerspace or hackathon? Why not a freelance or volunteer project, as well?

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They have to want to work first. Where there's a will, there's a way. But that's a two way street.

If you really want to try and get them going on a project, then I would say meet up with them somewhere near to where they live. Coffee shop, diner, or one of their houses. Somewhere that they feel comfortable.

You know your friends, so I will leave whether you disclose the nature of the meeting up-front or not to you. Once you sit down with them, lay it out for them. Detail areas of the project that gives them a chance to succeed. If one of your friends is an amazing HTML/CSS/JavaScript developer, then say "Hey, I know you're good at xyz and have an opportunity for you. Interested?"

Best of luck to you in your endeavor... and what a wonderful friend to have!

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    Hmm so step 1, get them outside! – leeand00 Feb 20 '15 at 18:52
  • Yep, exactly. If they are at least willing to leave the house I'd say that's good sign. – Brian Feb 20 '15 at 18:52

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