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I currently have a job at a software company (in the US) in which recent quite a few senior people have left recent for managerial related decisions. The company used to be a great place to work, but it is going downhill. Two of my former co-workers have recommended me for a job at their new company (which they love). I sent in my resume and I immediately received a very eager response to come in for an interview and that my previous co-workers and some former classmates of mine who work there all had very good things to say about me. Honestly, I expect the interview to go quite well and I would not be surprised if they send me a job offer.

My question is, exactly what point during the process is it safe (and appropriate) for me to put in a two-weeks notice to my current employer? After I have a start-date at my new job? After I sign the job offer?

marked as duplicate by gnat, jcmeloni, IDrinkandIKnowThings, Chris E, yochannah Mar 7 '15 at 15:00

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    Never give out your resignation until you have something in writing and you and your new employer have signed them. – watercooler Mar 5 '15 at 7:19
  • If this is your first such experience, you should wait until you and a new employer reach a final agreement. You'll be better able to judge for yourself in later cases. I submitted resignations in all cases before even interviewing anywhere every time except my very first almost 40 years ago. It's worked very well for me. – user2338816 Sep 14 '16 at 11:19
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My question is, exactly what point during the process is it safe (and appropriate) for me to put in a two-weeks notice to my current employer? After I have a start-date at my new job? After I sign the job offer?

When you have a signed job offer(from both you and the company) and contingencies have been met

Why would you put in your two weeks just because your interviewing, have an offer, or you are negotiating. Negotiations could fail, finances could change. You could unexpectedly not pass a drug/background test. Don't do anything until you know you have the job!

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    I would add, when you have a signed job offer and all contingencies have been met. I received a job offer contingent on passing several background checks and drug testing. I did not submit a resignation until the last test was passed. Even though I knew I would pass, I didn't know when. The process could hit a snag and take longer than expected. – John Oglesby Mar 5 '15 at 5:24
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    Also, if you get the signed contract now and your starting date is in two month, consider whether you want to wait with your notice until two weeks before you actually want to leave. – Sumyrda Mar 5 '15 at 7:18
  • @JohnOglesby Good suggestion. I have updated my answer. – Ronnie W Mar 5 '15 at 15:47
  • @JohnOglesby that's a very good approach, I've actually seen people who were not taking drugs false positive on tests and lose an offer. (even after they were able to get the group who tested to confirm an error had occurred.) Fringe, case, but still it happens. – RualStorge Mar 5 '15 at 16:56
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Resignation should be submitted to current employer only after receiving firm offer letter from new employer. One should never resign before it. Business scenario is full of uncertainty all the time and you never know when new employer may decide to review their decision to hire/recruit. My advice, BE SAFE

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    No, you should wait until you have actually accepted the offer, and they have confirmed and set a start date. Until then, you don't really have the other job. – Olin Lathrop Mar 5 '15 at 17:21

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