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my company is not willing to pay my salary due post resignation. the company had agreed to a 6 days notice period from me and told me that they will pay me my salary for the previous month and also for the 6 working days of notice period after 45 days of last working day. its been 19 days since the 45 days are over but i have still not received my salary from them. Also now they are claiming that as per company policies, they will not pay me for my 6 additional working days which were as a notice period.. Kindly suggest what can i do to get that money from them

closed as off-topic by Chris E, gnat, IDrinkandIKnowThings, Roger, yochannah Apr 14 '15 at 10:51

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  • "Questions seeking advice on company-specific regulations, agreements, or policies should be directed to your manager or HR department. Questions that address only a specific company or position are of limited use to future visitors. Questions seeking legal advice should be directed to legal professionals. For more information, click here." – Chris E, gnat, IDrinkandIKnowThings, Roger, yochannah
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    country info would be nice to include. What do your copies of the company policies say? What do your copies of the agreement say? – mhoran_psprep Apr 12 '15 at 11:11
  • Did you actually work those six days? And do you have the agreement to pay them in writing somewhere? – DJClayworth Apr 12 '15 at 20:20
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I'll echo the sentiment for you to consult an employment lawyer. I had to do this to a previous employer who was spreading lies after my departure. One letter from him to them saying their statements were "actionable" shut them right up.

Do you have anything in writing at all or was this verbal? If the latter, you may have a problem with your word against theirs. But definitely still see a lawyer in either case.

The other thing you have on your side is your state's/country's labor bureau. Those never take kindly to reports of unpaid work. Employers usually get in trouble fast when unpaid work is reported.

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Objectively?

  • Talk to an employment lawyer as soon as possible.
  • Make a clear record of everything involved in the termination.
  • Keep a professional tone in all interactions with the company no matter what.

Sadly, these cases where companies try to cheat employees out of salary post-resignation are pretty common in some places. Often, companies cave as soon as they realize legal action will be taken. Appreciate the fact you got out when you did and involve a lawyer. Without a lawyer, there is little you can do that has a high chance of working and a lot you can do that can screw you over. Don't sign anything without talking to an employment lawyer.

  • And there is no reasonable reason why you would be paid later after resigning than someone who didn't resign. – gnasher729 Apr 12 '15 at 14:57
  • @gnasher729 they were his notice period - he was still an employee of the company doing his job during those 6 days. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Apr 12 '15 at 14:59

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