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The management at my company have been doing interviews to fill a few positions, I'm curious to know how the interviews are going, is it rude to ask one of the management about this?

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Absolutely not, ask away. It shows curiosity in the workings of the company beyond your immediate role. I would hate to have someone working for me who was afraid of appearing curious. If there are aspects of the interviewing process that the managers don't want to share with you, they won't.

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  • See, this was my thinking on it. If there were things they didn't want to tell they wouldn't tell, and I wouldn't be one to pry either. I'd basically just ask how the interviews went and whatever the management wants to share they'll share. – Ryguy Apr 16 '15 at 15:01
  • It's also a great way to see into the thought process on how things work in your company. Not all interviews are the same and practices change. I've learned a lot from getting involved in management before I managed anyone which probably made a big impact on how I manage people (for the better) I've also been able to notice problems in a companies health through being involved in management well before they became real problems allowing me to act in a more informed manner. (better to know too much than too little) – RualStorge Apr 16 '15 at 17:21
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In general it is not rude. As a current employee its natural to wonder how a major potential change to the office is going. The only time this might be rude is if a friend was interviewing. If the friend did poorly, the boss now has to either lie or explain that your friend "isn't a good fit".

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  • Nope, I don't know any of the candidates for the position, but you're right I wouldn't ask if it was a friend being interviewed. – Ryguy Apr 16 '15 at 15:34
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The answer depends on the corporate culture in your company and the manager you ask. In many companies most managers will be happy that one of their charges is taking an interest in the issues they are dealing with instead of 'only coming to them when you need something handled'.

Some managers however will feel that you're sticking your nose in business that doesn't concern you.

Personally, I would try to find one of the people from management in a more or less informal setting (at the coffee machine, after regular working hours, something like that) and ask the question at that time. I'd say the risk of receiving a bad response is very low and the potential goodwill you gain from showing interest outweighs the possibility that you may annoy someone for a brief moment.

As HLGEM points out, you should keep in mind that they cannot share the specifics of the candidates for confidentiality reasons. At most you'll get a cursory "We have some promising candidates for position A but position B is proving harder to fill".

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  • It's ok to casually ask how it is going, but be prepared to get only a general reply. They can't actually tell you the details of the interviews as that is confidential data especially before they make selections. – HLGEM Apr 16 '15 at 15:24

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