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I am a web developer and am constantly learning new technology. Currently I am heads down on Angular.js but also the pending JavaScript release (JS.NEXT), Node.js and React.js. These technologies would take years to master and months to have a confident working knowledge of.

How would you properly add these to a resume CV?

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I wouldn't want to see it labeled as a skill. However I wouldn't mind seeing a section of a resume saying something like Currently Learning (maybe this could be worded better) with those things listed.

I would be under the assumption that you are learning these things and have some small level of expertise on them. You could answer very basic questions and maybe discuss why they are good technologies to learn.

It would put me off if these were things you have barely looked at or just read an article on. If you can't have an intelligent conversation about why X is better to learn than Y then don't put it on there (I don't necessarily have to agree with your perspective but want to see that you have perspective).

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Personally, I make sure that on a resume I clearly distinguish between the things that I have mastered and the things that I am familiar with.

The things that I have mastered and are most relevant to the position, I make sure are at the top of my resume and stand out somehow (bold, bigger font, etc).

Things that I am only familiar with, I first decide if they are relevant to the position. If they are completely irrelevant, I wouldn't even include them, as they are just noise at that point. I hate when I have to interview someone and I look at their resume and it's just a comma delimited list of 30 different irrelevant technologies. It also makes me question their implied experience level in all of these different things.

If I have done some research into a relevant technology, I would make it clear that I am familiar with it, but by no means an expert. The language you use here can be important. For example, if you said you are experienced with Angular.js, I would take that to mean that you are pretty competent and knowledgeable about it. If you say you have experience with it or are familiar with it, then I would think you are maybe not an expert, but could get up and going with it fairly quickly.

If you are not confident enough to have either of these assumptions made, I would not list it at all, but maybe bring up the fact that you have been doing some personal research into it during the interview itself

  • +1 for "implied experience level". This is why each resume should be tailored to the company being applied to. And its exactly what I want to avoid when mentioning new technology I am currently learning. – Ben Racicot Apr 16 '15 at 20:35
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How would you properly add these to a resume CV?

I wouldn't.

I might add them to a cover letter, if the technologies are particularly relevant for the job of interest. And I'd certainly be ready to discuss what I was learning if the topic seemed relevant during an interview.

But what I happen to be reading and learning at an instant isn't something I'd put on my resume/CV.

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    This is what our HR department says too. However being a hiring manager I couldn't disagree more. I want to see what is in the pipes for an employee. Also like the author says, some things take a long time to master. I know it messes up the HR matching algorithms but I like seeing it. Areas like this on resumes stand out to me because it gives me insight to things the future employee thinks are important vs what they have had to use/learn. – blankip Apr 16 '15 at 19:15
  • I see both sides. From an applicant side wouldn't they want the algorithms picking it up though? It might actually get them in a pile of available candidates at some companies vs skipped because didn't meet at least 10 of 30 keywords. – blankip Apr 16 '15 at 20:00
  • @blankip Exactly. These technologies in particular are becoming standard and I want to work at a place that uses them. Am I masterful at them or have I built anything of value with them? No but I want to and am going to. – Ben Racicot Apr 16 '15 at 20:31

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