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During an HR interview over the phone (but this is well into the process, I've met with 7 people already in the past weeks I've progressed to the final round next week) I was asked point blank "what do you currently make?" I deferred and addressed the posted hiring range for the job and that I am very comfortable with that range + benefits. The HR interviewer responded that they understand me keeping it confidential but indicated that it would be helpful to disclose it and we moved along with the call.

All in all I felt awkward about the exchange. The hiring range whether low or mid range is more than I make now but at the time of the call feared that would incentivize giving me the low end offer, but I'm still concerned about how I responded.

Should I include in my thank you email my current salary or should I just let it go until since I have another interview follow up set up with the company and wait until negotiations to talk about it again?

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    Just for the future; never ever give them a range you'd accept. If you say "between 80k and 90k", all they hear is "candidate will accept 80k". – Alec Apr 23 '15 at 6:05
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Should I include in my thank you email my current salary or should I just let it go until since I have another interview follow up set up with the company and wait until negotiations to talk about it again?

Just let it drop. It sounds like you already told them their range is acceptable. This is enough information for them to make an offer.

Some people will say you should tell them, but you are in a great position.

Consider:

  • HR knows their range is agreeable to you
  • You've interviewed with the actual hiring manager (who can fight HR)
  • You will get a raise from your current position if you get an offer
  • Not telling HR will not prevent them from making you an offer (except in extreme cases of burecratic nonsense)

You have a really strong negotiating position right now. No reason to compromise that for no gain.

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Personaly you did exactly right. If they were going to be bad about it, they woudl have terminated the interview process. (Yes there are some companies which insist, not giving the information is a good way to weed out these companies as they are usually not so good to work for being overly bureaucratic and generally always trying to get something for nothing from you.) My personal opinion is that my current salary is none of their business unless I want it to be (for instance if the offer is lower than my current salary).

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Given the situation you describe, I wouldn't worry about it either way. You've already told them that their salary range is acceptable, and therefore in particular that the low end of their salary range is acceptable. They'll make an offer accordingly, but they'd still like to know your current salary, since getting extra information from you doesn't do them any harm. And they won't necessarily offer you at the low end just because they can, since they're interesting in keeping you as well as just getting you.

So, yes, let it go. If they ask again you don't have to tell them, but you also probably shouldn't assume that not telling them gives you a huge negotiating advantage compared with telling them.

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