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A few weeks ago I applied for a junior position. Everything went great, from the group interview to the personal interview with the manager. Yesterday they contacted me and told me that they are offering me an interview for a better paying position which is different than what I applied for.

I'm a bit nervous and I'm not really sure what to think about this, I applied for the more junior position because I had experience in it. Even though I like the idea of the other position, I'm not quite sure what to expect from it. The first position had a list of requirements but the new one does not.

How can I prepare for an interview in a situation like this? Are there things I need to be aware of? I am unsure if I am qualified for the other position.

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    Hi Ezequiel, welcome to the Workplace! Unfortunately we can't tell you what to expect from the job (see the questions which are on topic. For general interview advice look at this question – Ian Holstead Apr 25 '15 at 16:30
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    Hi Ezequiel, I made a pretty significant edit to your question to make it more on-topic here. Asking for specific responsibilities is off topic (because it's unique to every company) but I think your core question here is a great one. If this changed your intent to much feel free to edit and clarify - I think this is a great question! – enderland Apr 25 '15 at 18:01
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    Thanks @enderland , indeed, I also think this way the Question is better, and will be useful also for other people in a similar situation. It's my first question here, and wasn't sure in which way to formulate it. – Libereco Apr 25 '15 at 18:18
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"Dear HR person,

Thank you very much for the offer of an interview as a Junior Informatic Security Analyst. So that I can best prepare for the interview, would it be possible for you to forward me some information about the role?

Many thanks,

Me"

Or in other words - the best people to tell you what this role at this specific company entails are the people recruiting for it, not people on Stack Exchange.

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  • Thanks Philip for your answer :) ; I already did that, and they sent me a list of the 'positions responsabilities', and it seems to me that they are really bound to the Company's work system and if hired they already stated that there is a Capacitation Course; What I meant was, Is there any way to prepare for the interview, or to know what the interviewer would like me to already know?, In the previous position there was a list of Requisites, but there is none for this one. And that makes me puzzled. Thanks again Philip – Libereco Apr 25 '15 at 16:33
  • Ask them. Or trust that since they're serious enough to ask you to interview for this position they think you can do it or learn to do it, and ask these questions during the interview. – keshlam Apr 26 '15 at 1:02
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You have nothing to lose here, it seems to me. They already like you and will probably give you a position. At this point it's just a matter of which one.

The most important thing is to be confident. They think you can handle it -- and who would know better than they in the matter? Don't worry so much about needing to know company-specific things. They realize you are new and don't have all the answers.

They will probably ask you more of what they've already asked, or get specific about what you and they have already discussed, so in that sense you may not need to do that much more to prepare.

I would do more research about the company if you can -- find the people who you are interviewing with on LinkedIn if possible and find out what they know and are likely to ask about.

Know your resume, and practice telling your personal story about your skills and experience -- make a list of why they should hire you and not someone else.

Try your best and just be yourself.

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This shouldn't be a position to be worried about. Your potential employer has already known you well during previous interviews and may be they feel you are a better fit in the new position. I guess, in the next interview it would be just that they will introduce you to the new position and ask some general questions or your opinion about it, nothing technical.

If you really need to know what the new role is about, just shoot them a brief email requesting the description. They already like you! So relax and get rid of all worries! Good Luck!

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