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I work in the technical division of an online business in India.

My company got acquired by its direct competitor in last January. After the acquisition my ceo and another manager started a new company. The second manager already resigned from company and CEO is also moving from this company soon.

The problem I'm facing is the ceo and other manager is asking us to do the work of new company, like setting up servers, designing web pages, developing android app which takes lot of time. After the acquisition we are not having much work and they are using this as an excuse to get their work done. I feel this is unprofessional and unethical.

I plan to reject the requests, but I don't want to burn bridges. How should I handle this.

I have no manager in current company. I reported to CTO of the company before the acquisition. Now CTO is no longer part of the company and I report to the CEO.

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    You're going to have a very short career if you refuse to do what your employer asks. – TheMathemagician Apr 29 '15 at 13:51
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    Do I understand that your former CEO and manager, who have started a new independent company, are asking you to do things for them in the new company, even though you still work for your old company after it was taken over? If this is correct, your former manager has absolutely no authority to ask you to do ANYTHING for him unless you resign your position and work for them. Just tell them directly that you don't feel that is fair on your as you don't work for them. Be aware they are asking something that is entirely unreasonable. You can reject it with good conscience. – Jane S Apr 30 '15 at 2:08
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If I understand the situation correctly, your former CEO and manager, who have started a new independent company, are asking you to do things for them in the new company, even though you still work for your old company after it was taken over? If this is correct, your former manager has absolutely no authority to ask you to do ANYTHING for him unless you resign your position and work for them.

Just tell them directly that you don't feel that is fair on you as you don't work for them and are not being paid by them. Be aware they are asking something that is entirely unreasonable. You can reject it with good conscience.

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What company is employing you (paying your salary)? That's the one you work for. It sounds that that is now the direct competitor.

If your superiors at that company X ask/tell/order you to do work for another company Y you will have to estimate if that is a legitimate action. Ask their superiors to find out.

I do not understand your suggestion that there is no one you can ask this from. If company A is bought by B, B will have people in high(er) places.

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Your job is whatever your current management chain assigns you to do. Dragging your heels will only get you a poor performance review.

If you believe something is important to the company, make that argument to the company, with as solid a set of supporting arguments as you can find.

If you can convince them, great. If not your choices are to work on what they now consider important, or to seek employment elsewhere.

Being bought out is never fun, especially when what they're buying is the technology and experience and customer list rather than the product you have invested time and effort in. But you need to make sure you know exactly what the new requirements are, and address them. If you do so well enough they may be more willing to listen when you tell them something else is important too.

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