2

Long story short, I asked my manager at the company I interned with (I interned with them for 6 months) about any opportunities and he asked me come in for an interview for a full time position.

Usually after the interview I would ask the interviewer about their team, their daily routine or how I am as compared to the other interviewees or any other possible questions I might have in mind. But this time, situation is pretty different, it's the same company and almost the whole team is same.

So my question: what should I ask them to make myself stand out? They already know me well and really liked my work.

Or should I take this like any other interview?

  • Is this for another internship or a full-time position? – Thomas Owens May 6 '15 at 0:24
  • It's for a full time position. – user99244 May 6 '15 at 0:24
7

You won't need to ask as much about the company, but you will want to know about the job you are being interviewed for. If you have already worked with this manager, ask him how what you would be doing as a FT employee would be different than your experiences as an intern. Tell him "I know that as a FT employee more would be expected of me; what sort of things should I work on to come up to speed?" Use the fact that he already knows you to your advantage.

If they have asked you in after already working with you, then probably they have already decided that you are a person who they want to work with. You are already "good enough"; clinch the deal by showing them that you will be even better than they think.

How long has it been since they worked with you? If you have worked somewhere else, show them that you have learned and grown while you were gone. Also, that you were still thinking about them ("I learned to do X, and I remember thinking that X might be applied to Y (something they were doing)) - this might also be an opportunity to draw some subtle comparisons between this company and another that you worked for, leaving them with the impression that you felt you were a better fit for this company than for the other.

  • It will be almost more than a year I have worked with them. I did worked at two different places after I finished my internship with them. – user99244 May 6 '15 at 1:01
  • As Francine mentions, definitely make it clear to them how the experience you've accumulated since you've worked for them has made you better at your job and how it will benefit them. – Cronax May 6 '15 at 8:41
-1

What day do you want me to start?

When I've interviewed I always ask that question if I know I'd accept an offer from the company. In sales, you would call it a "closing" question.

  • I am still not that confident enough to think I have got the job but how do you know you have got it? – user99244 May 6 '15 at 1:48
  • @user99244: I know I got it because I'm at the interview. Right now you have an advantage because you already interned there and they liked you well enough to interview. Approach it that way. – NotMe May 6 '15 at 3:18
  • 2
    If I was interviewing you and you asked me that, you would immediately drop in my estimation. Because I am not hiring sales people and I intensely dislike being sold to. I have other people to interview, I would consider that you were too arrogant to work with if anyone else was acceptable. – HLGEM May 6 '15 at 19:45
  • @HLGEM: Obviously you've never interviewed me - but I assure you that any arrogance I have comes from a solid history of acquiring any job I decided I wanted. – NotMe May 6 '15 at 20:31
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    You don't always want "leaders". Too many people wanting to be the leader makes for a competitive situation, not in a good way. I'm with @HLGEM, I've been part of many groups interviewing for additions to our team and somebody who simply assumed he was going to be hired (unless he was on a "final" interview and we had given him some clear indication that he was at the top of our list) would be seen as pushy. Now, you could modify that approach by saying "assuming we seem like a good fit for each other, how soon could I start?" This shows intent without assumption. – Francine DeGrood Taylor May 7 '15 at 0:31

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