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I started university without knowing anything about web development and I left with a great passion to learn more. Since then I have kept up to date with the moving industry. I have kept my front end skills up to date and I know that I have all the technical knowhow for a junior position. 

I have a disability called cerebral palsy. It affects my walking and my speech; whilst none of this is too severe, it has played a big role in me doubting myself. Every job that I used to see advertised said "communication skills are a must" and, since I have a speech problem, it used to make me hold back. Months turned into 4 years. 

Now I am at a point where I really want to get started. I have the passion and commitment. At the moment I am working on building my empty Git account with repositories of sample work using the JavaScript technologies that I like, and along the way I am writing blog posts which I'll start publishing soon. 

I am aware that when I start applying it's not going to be easy and I'm not going to get the first job that I apply for - but will the fact that I haven't worked for four years, that I have no commercial experience, be such a disadvantage that no one would accept me, with the idea of "where has he been for four years"? 

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    communication skills are a must is just a cliché, people add this automatically to every job ad... at least 99.9% of them. Even for cleaning/housekeeping jobs there is such requirement often, whom are they supposed to communicate with? So just ignore and focus on your professional skills. – Eugene Petrov May 25 '15 at 21:53
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    Go for it. You have skills. Consider all the telecommute jobs in which you don't need to speak or walk. – paparazzo May 26 '15 at 2:04
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    I am writing blog posts which I'll start publishing soon - these count as communication skills. Maybe better than anything else in this field... – Pavel May 26 '15 at 11:12
  • Keep in mind, that many progressive companies (in the US at least) will see you as a diversity hire (your disability). This will actually give you an advantage over others, in the case that if your skills and interview impressions are similar to other applicants, you will be made an offer before them. – EkoostikMartin May 26 '15 at 16:06
  • @EkoostikMartin So you'd recommend I add my condition in the CV – relidon May 26 '15 at 19:35
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will the fact that I haven't worked for four years, that I have no commercial experience be such a disadvantage that no one would except me, with the idea of "where has he been for four years"?

If you are applying for entry-level positions, then the lack of commercial experience won't matter.

Still, you may have to answer the question "What have you been doing since graduation?"

Be prepared with an honest well-thought-out answer.

Explain how your disability held you back in the past, but how you have overcome it to the extent that it is no longer an impediment for you. If you aren't yet able to deliver that answer confidently, find someone to practice with, or take a video of yourself. Practice until you come across as confident, sincere, and ready to start working hard.

Remember that "communication skills are a must" doesn't mean "must have perfect speech." Instead, it means that you must be able to communicate well with others. They must be able to understand you, and you must be able to understand them. Much of that will be written, some of that will be oral. Don't worry about this.

  • "If you are applying for entry-level positions, then the lack of commercial experience won't matter." Would it matter that I haven't done anything in 4 years – relidon May 26 '15 at 22:51
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First, don't be discouraged by "communication skills a must". Those employers are less interested in the physical act of speaking than they are in you knowing what to say -- which your condition does not hinder.

I recently just started working as a developer again after several years away from work-related hands-on coding. There are definitely jobs out there. You're on the right track with building up a public code base and a programming related blog; these will help immensely.

In short, if you can demonstrate ability, willingness to learn, passion, and that you are easy to get along with, the four years does not need to be an insurmountable hurdle to getting a development position.

I salute you :). Good luck!

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I have a disability (called cerebral palsy) it effects my walking and my speech, whilst non of them are too severe, they have played a big role on me doubting myself.

Doubt is the killer of dreams. Never ever ever doubt yourself

Now I am at a point where I really want to get started. I have the passion and commitment.

Well then

At the moment I am working on building my empty git account with repositories of sample work using the JavaScript technologies that I like, and a long the way, I am writing blog posts which I'll start publishing soon.

Let us know our Git account handle and website, we'll check it out!

"where has he been for four years"?

If the job is a fit and you are truly motivated, the interviewer will look past your obstacles (actually, the fact that you are overcoming your obstacles is a bonus), and hire you.

Update

I googled this disability, and I didn't know Miss USA 2008 also has it.

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