4

This question already has an answer here:

When you find a new job and apply for it, is it a common practice to tell your current employer. Do you tell your current employer that you have an interview when asked to come in to interview?

marked as duplicate by IDrinkandIKnowThings, enderland Jun 2 '15 at 19:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

22

No. If you do that, they will find your replacement and boot you as soon as it's opportune for them. Never let your employer know you're looking for another job until you actually have one.

  • 13
    And have one means you signed a written contract. Not before. – nvoigt Jun 2 '15 at 16:06
  • 5
    See it this way: if your current employer is looking for a replacement for you, they won't tell you beforehand, either. – Stephan Kolassa Jun 2 '15 at 16:13
  • 1
    Conversely, do not lie about having a job on your application, or you run the risk of not getting enough time to hand in your two-weeks notice. Unless you've earned enough vacation time that you can comfortably make it work. – Zibbobz Jun 2 '15 at 17:35
5

Is it a common practice to when you find a new job and apply for it that you tell your current employer or you tell your current employer that you have an interview when asked to come in to interview?

No, this is not a common practice. At least not in my part of the world.

Common practice is to use a personal day/vacation day/sick day, or to come in late or leave early - to attend the interview.

Here at least, folks would seldom tell their employer that they are interviewing. Only at the point where you have a signed offer with an agree-upon start date would you give your notice, and thereby inform your current employer.

[Note: Although it happens often in my part of the world, some would caution against calling in sick to attend an interview. As @weston points out, it's possible that you could lose your current job and any chance of getting a good reference if caught.]

  • I think you should explain what you mean by "use a sick day". You're not recommending "pulling a sickie" to attend interview are you? You could loose your current job and any chance of getting a good reference. – weston Jun 3 '15 at 14:59
  • "Common practice" could be construed as "acceptable practice". – weston Jun 4 '15 at 7:58
  • "That was the question being asked." The question doesn't ask how they should get the time required to take the interview, so I disagree that that part is in answer to the question. – weston Jun 4 '15 at 7:59

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.