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I am currently into my second month of an internship, reporting to a supervisor, who (together with another colleague) reports to the senior manager.

My supervisor holds multiple portfolios, and thus is extremely busy. While I progressively update the necessary records and search for new external providers, I find myself dealing with the recurring logistics at work for various programmes.

My dilemma falls into a situation where my colleague (who reports to the same senior manager as my supervisor) gets me involved in numerous projects, which I am more than happy to be part of and contribute my share of it. Furthermore, another senior manager in the department has also assigned me some tasks.

I am alright and most willing to take up all these tasks, but I can't help but to be worried if I am taking the right approach, to me, as an intern it is right for me to help whoever who needs some assistance in the department.

How should I be approaching such a situation? Should I be giving my supervisor updates time-to-time on what I'm working on?

All of us sit in the same office (except for the senior manager whom my supervisor is reporting to), and I can't help but feel a sense of guilt whenever I work on tasks given by other people and my supervisor walks past me.

Edit: Thank you everyone for your advice. I caught my supervisor in the hallway earlier this week and gave her a quick update on what I was working on, as well as checked with her if there was anything I could assist her with - she told me that I could just go ahead to work on the tasks that the rest of the team have assigned to me. In fact, this morning she even checked in on my progress and we had a casual chat on the existing task that I am working on. Thanks everyone!

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This is something that could be fairly easily resolved by just talking to your immediate supervisor about it. If he says he doesn't want you working on other people's tasks, then you can tell them no without guilt. If he says that's fine, then you can work on them without feeling awkward when your supervisor walks past and sees you working on them.

Find out what your supervisor wants you to spend your time on, and do that.

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Your direct supervisor is the one who is responsible for you and should be tracking your success. They should be your first line of defense.

I would try to schedule 30 minutes with them at least once a week (more frequently if necessary) to discuss your tasks. Something like: "I have tasks A, B, C, D. Does that seem like an appropriate amount of work for me? What should be the priority in which I work on these tasks." If the answer is 'no', then you need to drop some of these projects. As long as your manager is ok with the other tasks, then you have no reason to feel guilty. (If you can't get any time on their calendar try to catch them in the hallway. Essentially you need to have this conversation and they don't, so you may need to be somewhat pushy to get it depending on how busy they are.)

And to be clear: No one except your manager can assign you tasks. Your colleagues or other managers can request things of you, but literally they are not the boss of you. A perfectly valid response is "I need to check with my manager before agreeing to this" or "I can get to that, but let me finish this thing I'm working on first" or "I can't do that because I already have high priority work that needs to be done" etc.

On your other point: Should the intern be the task monkey? The best internships I've seen are ones where a specific project is designed for the intern that is suited to their skill level and helps them learn. Not all companies do this because interns are often seen as cheap labor to do some extra work. If you think that might be the case for where you are at, then you should take responsibility for your own success. Do the tasks you are assigned, but don't ONLY do that. Look for opportunities to do interesting work. Talk to your colleagues, go into meetings, try to learn things outside of the assigned work. If you see something interesting, ask if you can help out on that.

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My dilemma falls into a situation where my colleague (who reports to the same senior manager as my supervisor) gets me involved in numerous projects, which I am more than happy to be part of and contribute my share of it.

Your colleague meaning another intern? I know several bright Interns who wish to perform multiple tasks to expand their horizons. Plus you have every right to reflect this on resume.

Furthermore, another senior manager in the department has also assigned me some tasks.

As long as your direct supervisor is aware of these tasks. But even then, you can still do these tasks for learning and experience.

I am alright and most willing to take up all these tasks, but I can't help but to be worried if I am taking the right approach, to me, as an intern it is right for me to help whoever who needs some assistance in the department.

People who are the "go-to" person move up the ladder rather quickly.

How should I be approaching such a situation? Should I be giving my supervisor updates time-to-time on what I'm working on?

It's a great idea to meet with supervisor on periodic basis. Perhaps supervisor can provide you more tasks, guidance based on company's needs, your interests, and your talents.

I can't help but feel a sense of guilt whenever I work on tasks given by other people and my supervisor walks past me.

Guilt for being the "go-to" person? As long as you are doing your supervisor's tasks, and being a big help to others, and meeting with your supervisor regularly, it seems perfectly alright.

Don't worry about being too nice, or being a chump, in the end, the more tasks you are expert at, the more other people need you.

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