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After my interview, came my first day of employment, but with no previous information about the position's benefits nor responsibilities.

Now, the first day is done; and the benefits and salary are just offered "verbally"; I wanted to "negotiate" the salary, but the hiring person showed almost no will to increase the salary.(conversation ended here)

the contract would be signed after a month. I asked for the benefits and responsibilities emailed to me (not received yet).

Would be appropriate to negotiate it again after failing that on the first day?

(probably after considering their detailed email about the position)

Would it be good to mention a good job offer I received for a similar position?

(I really did and it's 30% higher salary)

or would it work better to wait until the contract is to be signed?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Philip Kendall, Dawny33, AndreiROM, HorusKol Jan 5 '16 at 22:51

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  • Did you verbally accept the offer? – Brian Dishaw Jun 8 '15 at 0:05
  • I only showed interest and will to work, but not a verbal yes – Abeer Sul Jun 8 '15 at 0:09
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    Actually you implicitly accepted the verbal offer by showing up to work. But you need to get it in writing. A verbal offer is a puff of air. They could pay you literally anything. – Jane S Jun 8 '15 at 0:23
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    So what are they paying you in the interim? Are you being paid? What happens if after a month of free labour they make a ridiculously low offer? Or decide to fire you? Get a contract before you do ANYTHING. – Jane S Jun 8 '15 at 0:55
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    @AbeerSul formation for the job counts as work, too. Start up or not, working for them for free is a bad idea. – SJuan76 Jun 8 '15 at 0:55
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Would be appropriate to negotiate it again after failing that on the first day?

I can't imagine starting a job without first having the salary in writing (along with all other details). Perhaps that's not unusual in your locale? It's very unusual in mine.

If it were me, I wouldn't show up for work without completing negotiations and getting a written agreement.

I wouldn't wait until the instant the contract was about to be signed, if I didn't believe the contract would include what I wanted.

Would it be good to mention a good job offer I received for a similar position?

You can use whatever leverage you think you have while you negotiate. Be prepared to not be given more than was verbally promised. And be prepared with how you will intend to act in response.

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