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This question already has an answer here:

Before you flag it as a duplicate I think my situation is a bit different from others I've read on here. I am currently in school studying for comp sci and was supposed to get co-op job this summer so I canceled my planned trip to Europe. Now for reasons co-op never happened and I was stuck with nothing to do for the summer. I applied at places and got a job at a warehouse. The job is pretty dull and boring and I feel like I'm losing IQ working there. Now I got a job offer from a pretty big ISP to work in tech support but the catch is that I have to start immediately. I would really like to give a 2 weeks and quit properly but unfortunately that'd not an option. If I get the job at the ISP how should I go about quitting the warehouse on the spot?

marked as duplicate by David K, The Wandering Dev Manager, Jane S, gnat, scaaahu Jun 12 '15 at 2:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    "If I get the job at the ISP..." Do you have an offer or not? – jmorc Jun 11 '15 at 20:22
  • Why is giving two weeks not an option? It's pretty standard procedure - the ISP should understand. – David K Jun 11 '15 at 20:27
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    Also, aside from not giving two weeks, I see no difference between your question and this one – David K Jun 11 '15 at 20:31
  • @JoeStrazzere It's manual labour, no one cares. – Jack Jun 11 '15 at 22:38
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    @Jack Well THAT'S not true. – zfrisch Jun 11 '15 at 23:25
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If you have decided to leave the same day, regardless of the fact that you will have burnt a bridge you do this:

"Boss, thanks for the opportunity but this isn't for me." Then hand him a piece of paper that you resign effective immediately.

If they've given you anything (work clothes, id or security badge, etc) then make sure you have it with you at the time you are quitting. Ask the manager what process you need to follow from that point.

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    +1 for being straight to the point. Additionally, don't ask for a reference and leave it off of your resume. – Myles Jun 11 '15 at 22:01
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    Note that "on you" should mean"with you" -- if at all possible, you want to be in street clothes rather than company uniform so you don't have to change under pressure. – keshlam Jun 12 '15 at 0:12
  • @keshlam: absolutely – NotMe Jun 12 '15 at 19:52

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