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I am wondering if it is a good idea to put my Cv online to be able to share it more easily.

For example on www.mywebsite.com/cv

What are the pro and the cons?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Roger, gnat, IDrinkandIKnowThings, Jane S, scaaahu Jun 16 '15 at 2:59

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More easy to find is always a mixed blessing.

If your contact info is on there, and the sharing method is super public, you will get plenty of spam. And recruiters. Which, depending on your perspective, may also be spam.

Any medium is only as good as the ratio of useful/useless stuff you get from it.

Better Targeting

It's always better to put your resume someplace where people with jobs are hunting. Getting enough matches on a Google Search when your CV is on a random site is going to be harder than getting good hits on a large, good reputation site in your particular industry. For example, LinkedIn, Monster.Com, etc. These can also be fairly spam-based, depending on your industry... but at least 90% of the spam relates to people who don't know how to read your CV and are just randomly offering opportunities that don't fit you. They are less likely to solicit you for online gambling, medical treatments you don't need and for the opportunity to send money to Nigeria.

The Paranoid View

There's always the risk that the more someone knows about you, the more they can hack your life. For example, if a random attacker knew you played hockey at RIT, they would know the mascot was a tiger, and they might try "go Tigers!" as your password. It would also be easy for someone who sees your resume to set up a very reasonable fake profile for you on almost any professional social network site.

Or they can stalk you at your present company.

Or probably many other things that I am not creative enough to think up.

Conversely...

A site showing your talents, not just talking about them can be a real win. By that I mean a portfolio, not a CV. Technical writers and UX designers do this to great effect, as do artists. I have absolutely enjoyed and benefitted from looking at the work of engineers, when their work has been available, and I will totally read their github repositories if they volunteer the info.

Those are all things that social networking sites really can't help you with (although Stack Overflow has some nice settings for linking this into your profile). Those really do add values.

Neutral - You'll have to send a text/Word/PDF anyway

Every recruiter and/or company is still going to want their own copy, since their systems may not accomodate a URL.

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If you list your phone number, you will likely get several more spam calls that usual. If you only list your full name and email, that should limit the spam to email, which you are likely already getting.

Especially if you already have a website or blog, adding a CV is a natural step (without a phone number). If you don't already have one of these, its unlikely to generate many good leads as only bottom of the barrel recruiters (and other bottom feeders) are likely to get leads from a google search.

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Assuming you are in a technical profession (or even if you're not), having a personal website is a great way to set yourself apart from others.

Don't think of it as simply something to be found by recruiters doing a search - include a link to it in your e-mail signature, social media profiles, etc. You could build one from scratch (and should if that's your field) or you could use something like SquareSpace or a more focused site builder such as about.me

I'm puzzled by the suggestion that you could be bothered by people calling you to talk about job opportunities. That's sort of the point, isn't it? At any rate, you could use a Google Voice number to screen calls. It will record the callers voice, then call you and see if you want to take the call. If not, it goes to voice mail. Nifty.

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    It depends who is calling. People calling to offer you jobs that you might really want to seriously consider: hooray! People calling with jobs you have zero interest in: a few might simple be a minor distraction, but many could get seriously annoying. People calling with scam offers: big minus. I haven't been looking for a job for 4 or 5 years and I get several emails per day informing me that some big company has offered me a job paying big bucks and I just need to click on this link to accept the offer. As I think it unlikely that someone would offer a professional job without even one ... – Jay Jun 15 '15 at 21:35
  • ... conversation with the candidate, I'm sure that it's some sort of scam. I've never clicked on the link to find out just what. – Jay Jun 15 '15 at 21:36

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