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My cover letter has two intended recipients. How do I handle putting two names in the address and salutation?

EDIT: Format is important - I'd still expect the address to look like this:

Name
Title
Company/Organization Name
Address
City, ST Zip Code

Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name:
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    Send a separate copy to each of them...? – keshlam Jun 24 '15 at 4:01
  • Alphabetically? In order or seniority? By number of letters? Really, this is very opinion based as there is no way that is more or less acceptable. Besides, I don't honestly think the recipients really care whose name appears first :) – Jane S Jun 24 '15 at 4:03
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    In that case, put the common address at the top, and then put both names into your salutation (in any arbitrary order). This is what I do if I have to write formal documents to multiple people at an organisation. Really, it's the content they will be reading :) – Jane S Jun 24 '15 at 4:25
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    @JaneS I'd recommend using alphabetical order instead of arbitrary. With alphabetical you will have a clear, concise, indisputable answer if one of the recipients' ego gets hurt. :) – Project Shepherding Jun 28 '15 at 10:52
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    @ProjectShepherding I completely agree. My point was that your two recipients wouldn't really care, but if you must choose something then alphabetic is the most logical :) – Jane S Jun 28 '15 at 10:56
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It is the content of the cover letter that is important, more than the header information.

If you're applying for two different positions, then you should have two cover letters, and two applications, even if there is only one employer. Some software won't allow that (which is what I suspect from your comments).

If you're applying for two different but essentially similar positions, or only one cover letter is allowed, then one cover letter is what you have. In that case, after the section with your own contact information, then put only the most generic of their contact information. You don't need their names or titles in that section, just the company and address. And then address the letter to 'Dear Hiring Manager' or 'Dear Hiring Professor'

Company/Organization Name 
Address 
City, ST Zip Code

Dear Hiring Manager:

Then, write a compelling cover letter for why you would be a good choice for the job, with specific and pertinent achievements from previous jobs, in a way that augments rather than repeats your resume. That's the important part.

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I'm assuming you want to use postal mail and both recipients can be addressed as Mr/Ms (instead of Ph D., Dr. or whatever).

Since you are sending only one application, there is no need to write separate addresses on the inside, but only the address you're sending the letter to.

Keeping both names on the inside is useful since chances are that the letter and the envelope gets separated by an administrator, so you want to be sure both recipients are informed of the application's arrival.

Writing each name and each title in the same line will help keeping the format clean and simple.

So I'd recommend using:

[...]

Name #1 (alphabetical order), Job Title #1
Name #2 (alphabetical order), Job Title #2
Company/Organization Name
Address
City, ST Zip Code


Dear Mr/Ms. Name#1 and Mr/Ms. Name#2: (alphabetical)
[...]

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