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On my resume, I list the following

University Name - City, ST                                Year
Bachelor of Science - C.S.

Should I list the full title instead (Computer Science) or should I shorten it B.S.C.S.

Any help is appreciated

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    Write Computer Science out. B.S. is ok but can also be written out – jmorc Jun 26 '15 at 23:14
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As a rule, the title should always come first. As en employer, what would you like to know first? What the prospective employee studied? Or where?

It also shows what you are considering more important. What you learnt? Or which university you attended.

Also. Try not to abbreviate anything.

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    I would have so much trouble not writing "BTW don't abbreviate" ;) – Jane S Jun 27 '15 at 3:01
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    It depends on where you went. If you went to MIT, I would write the university name first. If you went to some school under a bridge somewhere, write your degree. – user37427 Jun 27 '15 at 9:44
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As a recruiter it really doesn't matter. BS in relation to a degree is a pretty well understood abbreviation. Saying you shouldn't abbreviate it is like saying you shouldn't abbreviate "USA" or "Dr." Computer Science usually looks better spelled out though it's also common enough to be recognized by anyone who matters.

If the university is well known there's really no need to list city and state (especially if the city or state are actually in the name of the school!)

I would leave year of graduation off. It only invites age discrimination and adds nothing of real value. If a company really cares they find out when you graduated as part of your background check.

Also if you have more than 5 years of experience put your education at the bottom of your resume. If you've been in the business for 5+ years you'd better have done something more impressive to catch my attention than simply graduate from school. Less than that putting it at the top is still acceptable.

Finally, never include GPA. It's a completely useless number.

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    Fun fact: I once had a recruiter badger me over & over asking for my GPA. I kept telling him I don't know, and he kept telling me the company he was applying to needed that information. So I told him it's probably not a company worth my time! – user37427 Jun 27 '15 at 9:45

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