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There are two Chinese guys in my team. They are adamant about not speaking English. We are meant to be working on the same project, but I have no clue what's going on. Say I want to upload some code, but it turns out they already have been working on it. My British line manager is overloaded with work so he has no time to pay any attention. I tried speaking to him and also the founder of the company and they asked the Chinese to speak English at work. But they just ignore it and at the end of the day they are very productive working together -- so the founder doesn't really care. Now I end up working alone and without a clear direction. I hate the situation. In general I feel that the founder of the company has no clear vision and is not good at building the company. I want to leave (or maybe I will be kicked out, because I end up being less productive than the Chinese duo). How do I explain to prospective employers why I want to leave. I have been to several interviews lately and they all ask the reason for wanting to leave.

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    Which is the real reason you want to leave? The uncooperative coworkers, or the poorly managed company? – Kent A. Jul 9 '15 at 12:20
  • Exactly. The first is merely a symptom of the latter :) – Jane S Jul 9 '15 at 12:41
  • Why not just be tell them the truth about why you want to leave? You can leave out the part where you feel the founder has not clear vision. – paparazzo Jul 9 '15 at 13:04
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    I was in the process of writing an answer when the question was closed =^). A diplomatic way to handle it would be to say that your current position is a poor cultural fit, because the rest of the team prefers not to speak English, and thus you are unable to fully participate. This shows that you want to be a team player, you are just in a situation where it's made impossible. This shouldn't count against you, unless the job you are applying for requires you to speak Mandarin. (Yes, there are other problems with your current company, but there's no need to go into all that.) – LindaJeanne Jul 9 '15 at 13:46
  • You can be honest without being brutally honest. "It is no longer a good fit for me. There was a change in the corporate culture which led to critical information not flowing." – Myles Jul 9 '15 at 18:17