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I had just accepted a new offer and start training next week for Company A.

Hadn't heard anything from my first choice employer, Company B for an interview. I would love working for both companies, but Company B aligns more with what I want to do.

I added the new position to my LinkedIn profile when I got a call from Company B to set up an interview. After my initial phone conversation, I noticed he looked up my LinkedIn profile and sees my new position.

How do I explain to him that I would much rather work for him, without looking like a total red flag job hopper. I know this was a dumb move on my part to be a little premature on the posting but I honestly hadn't heard anything back from this company for weeks and even after following up, I still didn't get a call back.

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    So you added company A to your profile before you had even started to work for them. Your statement that you hadn't heard from company B is just an excuse. Your problem. I don't add a company to my Linkedin profile until I have worked long enough for them to know what I am doing for them on a day to day basis. Right now, you couldn't even ask anyone at Company A for a reference so yes, I agree that your putting in Company A into your profile was a move that's premature and most likely, dumb. – Vietnhi Phuvan Jul 10 '15 at 8:15
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    If this is what the management of Company B is like, I'd seriously reconsider how much you want to work for them. Company A has been forthright with you, and you accepted the offer. Company B was stringing you along, and now that you found something else, they're coming back to you. Do you honestly think things would be better after you'd signed with Company B? My opinion only. YMMV. – Wesley Long Jul 10 '15 at 15:12
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    @WesleyLong You have no way to know that company B is stringing the OP along. One possibility is that their top candidate turned them down and Company B is making the offer to the OP as the next best candidate.Or maybe it is that Company B's hiring process is just slow. Example: Google's hiring process used to be slow. – Vietnhi Phuvan Jul 10 '15 at 21:53
  • @VietnhiPhuvan, granted we cannot know everything that went on in Company B, but the OP clearly mentionned "I hadn't heard anything back from this company for weeks and even after following up, I still didn't get a call back". Not very nice from Company B, even if they have a slow recruiting process ... – Hoki Nov 6 at 11:27
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You can tell them the situation and explain that you had written it off due to the lack of communication, but I think you're pretty much hamstrung, I'm afraid.

It's likely that you have not helped your chances at all (and it's understandable given you hadn't heard anything), and I suspect you'll be staying at Company A but it depends on the hiring manager.

The only thing you can learn from this is next time to only update your LinkedIn profile after you've commenced your new role.

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How do I explain to him that I would much rather work for him, without looking like a total red flag job hopper.

I'm going to assume you are willing to reneg on your acceptance with Company A in order to pursue a possible job with Company B. And I'm going to assume you don't want to immediately tell Company A that you will not be joining them. (These aren't necessarily choices I would make, but I suspect you wouldn't have posted your question if this wasn't the path you are choosing.)

It will be hard to avoid looking like what you are - someone who already accepted a job and now wants to interview at another company.

Since you believe that the individual at Company B looked at your LinkedIn profile where you announced your acceptance, you obviously cannot hide the fact. Presumably, this person still want to hire someone who just accepted a job - although you probably don't really know the sequence of events here. He may have seen your Company A acceptance before calling you, or after calling you. Either way, honesty is probably the best policy here.

When you interview at Company B, if and only if you are asked about Company A, then indicate that you feel odd about the situation, but that you really want to work at Company B. You might add that you had been hoping to hear from them initially, and perhaps weren't as patient as you should have been.

If asked, you might need to come up with an answer to the question "How can we know that you won't turn right around and quit our company after we make an offer, if you are invited to interview at yet another company?"

Hopefully, you don't have other job-hopping indications in your background.

Of course, should you accept an offer from Company B and quit Company A abruptly, you should expect to burn your bridges with Company A, and everyone there.

And if you are not offered a job at Company B, your willingness to hop from A to B might actually work against you in Company B, in the eyes of different Company B hiring managers. Not everyone at Company B may be as willing to overlook this as the person who read your LinkedIn update and contacted you.

I know this was a dumb move on my part to be a little premature on the posting

It's a good lesson for the future.

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