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What would be an acceptable percentage increase to expect for a new position within a company? I recently applied, interviewed and was offered a new position within my company. I want to be sure the percentage increase that I received would be as expected or if I should negotiate for more. One the one hand, I don't want to sound like a complainer... But on the other hand, I've often heard that many people don't negotiate when they should.

The new position comes with more responsibility, including significant travel and contact with customers. It also requires some skills that I do not have, but they know that I don't have the skills. They and I both know that I will be able to learn these skills. I have proven time and again that I will meet, accept and overcome challenges. I believe that is part of the reason that they have offered me the position. I know that they have looked far and wide for someone to fill the position unsuccessfully that would meet all of their criteria.

I have read this post: Can you negotiate salary on a promotion? This will certainly help, but I just don't know what the right amount should be. Salary.com says no...not even close, but as I've read, that's not a good negotiating point.

I would just like to know what's normal. What percent increase is normal?

closed as off-topic by yochannah, Philipp, Philip Kendall, Jane S, scaaahu Jul 13 '15 at 2:37

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  • It all depends . I'm guessing 10% is reasonable, and 15% is decent. – Adel Jul 12 '15 at 19:10
  • possible duplicate of How should I properly approach my boss if I'm feeling underpaid? – yochannah Jul 12 '15 at 19:21
  • What are your old and new job titles? – Dan Henderson Jul 12 '15 at 20:52
  • I had hoped to keep the details out of the question, but clearly that won't work. My current position is titled Systems Engineer, but in actuality I am a Software Developer. The problem is that I work in a manufacturing environment with other manufacturing engineers. The position that I have been offered is an Applications Engineer. The promotion was for 10% increase. I would like to request a 20% increase. – KSK Jul 12 '15 at 21:04
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    20% is significant. If I were the hiring manager, I would want to see a justification for a 20% increase based on what you will do above and beyond what you do now. – Jane S Jul 12 '15 at 21:14
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As with all salary negotiation - acceptable is whatever the two parties can agree to.

If Application Engineers in your area are on average earning 20% more than your current rate, then you have that on your side. However, this is not the whole argument won (as you've read for yourself in other questions) - as with all jobs there are ranges around the average, because not all engineers are equal and not all jobs have the same duties and responsibilities.

There's also what your company is willing to pay - they might realise that 20% is not so bad if that is the market average - but they might feel that that your job doesn't need to be paid that much if they think it could be done by someone with less ability than "average" (this is not an evaluation of your ability - but what they think the job requires - end of the day, you get paid for the job you do, not the job you could do).

If you asked for the 20%, and the company wants 10% - would you be happy with settling for 15%? That's what you really need to ask. If the answer is no, and you really want that 20%, then you will need to dust off your resume.

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