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So right now I'm an intern, I believe I have a supervisor who is also supposed to be a mentor that can help me. I tend to send him the demos of my work and to report on progress. Hes also super busy, and I don't manage to see him most of the time. However, now there is also a Project Management Assistant or someone in Project Management who also emails me for my progress so that I have two people I have to report to/or at least keeps emailing for my work. I try to cc them both when I report back but I don't think they're on the same page and they're busy with other stuff so that they don't even meet as often as I do with each other.

Is there a right way of communicating so I don't get my inbox swarmed and have to explain things separately to both of them everytime?

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Is there a right way of communicating so I don't get my inbox swarmed and have to explain things separately to both of them everytime?

Yes. Simply set up a meeting with both supervisors and ask them who you should be reporting to (and be prepared to hear that you should be reporting to both of them). Ask if you can send out just one update email to both of them instead of two different reports every time, or if all three of you can have a once a week/month/whatever meeting so everyone is caught up to date at the same time. Explain that the less time you have to spend with email, the more time you spend on the project.

That said, some managers will still want you to report separately. If that's the case, it's what you'll have to do. Many managers, however, will be thrilled to hear that someone else is handling it, and will say "Just report to person X" This is especially true when one person is a Project Manager while the other is a business manager.

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Keeping your immediate supervisor in the loop and then including other necessary parties informed via CC on emails is the fairly standard way to handle those kind of issues. When it comes to a manager who is not the most supportive or communicating effectively, you next option is to go to his supervisor or another manager on the team who holds the same level of influence within your group such as the project manager. What matters is you show initiative towards communication and if later on your manager comes back with issues, you can politely refer back to the unanswered communication on their part with a simple "After reaching out to you, you seemed pretty busy, so the project manager informed me to do ....". That shows you're proactive and their qualm if any will be more so with the project manager than you.

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