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I have been working in a software development company from last five months as a software developer. In my appointment letter it is clearly written over there that I shall get hike on my salary after completing my first five months here. This July is my fifth month here running. And suddenly yesterday my project manager called me up and said I shall be working in testing department from now on. And there is no chance of my salary hike. I asked for the clarification what for they are putting me in testing. The answer was," We need man power there more." Then I asked when you will put me back here in development, the answer was," Can not say anything now, lets see." I always used to complete my given tasks in time and he always used to like that. Then what could be the reason? I am not liking it here in testing. And I can say it is a demotion for me in my workplace. What should I do?

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    You may want to have a lawyer check your contract. Although most include terms like "and additional tasks as required", giving you a different job altogether is probably not even covered by your contract. – nvoigt Jul 21 '15 at 12:31
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    If the greater need is in the testing department, then it's silly to want to pay you LESS to work there. (This attitude may be WHY the testing department is short-handed...) – LindaJeanne Jul 21 '15 at 13:38
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    Them tossing you into a different department as needed sucks but is probably business as usual. Them not honoring a detail of the contract is big and should be properly addressed to your satisfaction. – Myles Jul 21 '15 at 19:05
  • There's the additional factor of dev => tester, unless it's an automation developer role? Lots of questions about that on this site, tldr is it's bad for your career as a dev. – Nathan Cooper Jul 22 '15 at 6:52
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    If it were me, I would be beyond furious. I'm a developer, not a tester. The broken promise on the raise is equally unforgivable. – James Adam Jul 22 '15 at 12:49
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I've been in precisely the same situation as you a few years ago. What I can conclude is, in my case, things got even worse, because

  • I had relatively little qualification for the new responsibilities,
  • the new department was interested in “ready-to-use” professionals and would happily remove unprepared workforce,
  • the newly created department needed to show off as soon as possible, KPIs, ROI and such,
  • the pace suddenly became high and requirements higher, so I quickly rolled down to worst performers in this department,
  • mostly unconsciously, the new things I was intended to do weren't the ones I'd like to do in my life, so I refused to do my best at a lot of ongoing tasks,

which led to what, how do you think? Right, my promotion just evaporated into thin air. Gone. And what is more, I was heading straight to risk zone of being laid of for poor performance. And all that after the long track record of successes and backbreaking work.

Also, things to consider:

  • after a department has been created, it often, in reality, has a very short roadmap. Nobody would be able to explain you comprehensively what new career opportunities you're going to get exposed to;
  • a newly created department is at the spotlight. You may or may not like being suddenly put in from of everyone's eyes;
  • it's likely you may just forget about education and skill improvement budget and friendly atmosphere because, for the reasons listed above, one day you wake up in highly competitive atmosphere which can turn hostile and even chaotic.

Speaking of myself, after that happened, I was thinking for too long and lost valuable time and did things wrong, overcommitted, spent too much time at work or being too absorbed by work, and all for nothing because today I don't need that experience, title, or (negligibly developed and almost non-marketable) skills.

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    In addition, after reflecting a bit, I came to an inference that, as a manager and in extreme cases, I would use this scheme to lay off undesirable workers. Take them, put into newly created department with shockingly new requirements, watch them go away unfulfilled, then eliminate that department. – rishat Jul 22 '15 at 6:21
  • The OP doesn't specify that it's a new department, just that he was moved by force there. – dyesdyes Jul 22 '15 at 15:32

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