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For the past year I have been under a lot of stress as the result of a reorganization of my department in order to grow the company aggressively. As a result I was just out of work three weeks. Upon my return to work I decided to step down from my AVP Title to include all tasks it included. I stated I would continue to manage the office. I did this in writing 4 days prior to my first day back. The original letter went to my boss with copies going to the Pres.; my supervisor and HR. It has been two weeks and no one has approached me to discuss. The silence is causing more stress than the initial bullying. I have been quietly working up to now making any necessary changes as I expressed I would. However, I'm wondering now if their lack of action should be addressed?

closed as off-topic by gnat, paparazzo, scaaahu, Alec, Telastyn Aug 19 '15 at 13:31

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    Have you followed up with any of these parties? – Jane S Aug 19 '15 at 3:11
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Assuming you are in an at will employment relationship, each party (employee and employer) can ask for a change in the relationship at any time, however the other party does not have to agree to it. You have announced a change in your job without getting agreement from your employer. They do not have to accept the arrangement you propose.

Because you have not heard back, it is possible they are considering your proposal and trying to figure out what to do about it. They may come back with a counter proposal. They may accept your offer, and they may want to negotiate salary. They may come back with an acceptance of your resignation from your role as AVP but not offer you an office manager role (because they prefer the two to be held by one person). They may tell you to choose between your current mixed role and resignation.

I would suggest you ask your manager for a meeting to discuss your proposal and ask what is possible. This will at least start communication and ease your discomfort over the silence.

Good luck!

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I did this in writing 4 days prior to my first day back. The original letter went to my boss with copies going to the Pres.; my supervisor and HR. It has been two weeks and no one has approached me to discuss. The silence is causing more stress than the initial bullying. I have been quietly working up to now making any necessary changes as I expressed I would. However, I'm wondering now if their lack of action should be addressed?

This is something you should have done in person, and once an agreement was reached, you should have confirmed it in writing.

It isn't appropriate for someone to unilaterally declare "from now on my job will be X" and expect silence to imply agreement from your employer.

For your own benefit, and for your career, you need to get to the bottom of what is going on, and you need to do it quickly.

Right now, go to your boss and discuss your situation face-to-face. Talk about what changes you would like, and why. Attempt to reach an agreement about the specifics of a change, and the timing. Then follow it up with an email, and go about making it happen.

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