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I'm currently working, and I am overqualified for the job, and it also pays low, not in line with my degree and with no chance of being promoted to the position I want. I only found this out when I started, and as such I dont see myself staying on the company.

I am referred by a friend to a job which is more in line with my degree and I expect an interview after a week. My contract stipulates that resignation is only effective after 30 days of filing a resignation letter.

Interviewers always ask how soon an interviewee can start.

MY QUESTION NOW is: Are my chances low when I tell the potential future employers that I can start in a month? OR do they only consider people who can start ASAP? Is starting a month after considered way too long for a start date? Do they consider also people who are applying even when they are still employed?

closed as off-topic by gnat, Jan Doggen, Jim G., user8365, IDrinkandIKnowThings Aug 24 '15 at 17:21

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  • 1
    what country are you in? In the UK, I've almost never had a notice period shorter than a month. And it's been just fine :) – yochannah Aug 22 '15 at 20:14
  • Yeah, IT in the UK is heading for 3 months, even contractors are ending up on 1 month (usually 1 week from experience) – The Wandering Dev Manager Aug 23 '15 at 7:53
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In general, employers are well aware that notice periods are pretty much universal and therefore don't expect that people they hire will be available to start tomorrow. Whether or not a month's notice is going to be acceptable to a particular employer isn't something we can tell you, but it's not a ridiculous length of time, particularly for a professional position.

That said, your CV should always make clear what your availability is so that nobody gets a nasty shock.

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Are my chances low when I tell the potential future employers that I can start in a month? OR do they only consider people who can start ASAP?

In your case (and in the case of many others) 1 month is ASAP.

Employers have contracts stipulating their notice period. They understand that other employers have notice periods too, often periods of one month.

This likely won't affect your chances at all. Rather, they will likely respect you for adhering to your contractual obligations, just as they expect from their employees.

Is starting a month after considered way too long for a start date?

Not usually. In a few cases, where the need for a new hire is urgent, it may be too long to wait. Usually, that won't be the case.

Do they consider also people who are applying even when they are still employed?

Yes, of course.

Unless they are recruiting directly at colleges, companies almost exclusively hire people who are currently employed.

I'm currently working, and I am overqualified for the job, and it also pays low, not in line with my degree and with no chance of being promoted to the position I want. I only found this out when I started, and as such I dont see myself staying on the company.

Try to be more careful this time, and ask the questions you need answers for during the interview process. You don't want to have two short-term jobs in a row - that becomes harder and harder to overcome.

Be ready to explain the mistakes you have made with choosing your last job (since it's likely to come up in your interviews), and why you won't make them again.

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Is starting a month after considered way too long for a start date?

It depends where you live, and in what industry you work

In the US, most people have at will employment: you can quit or fire someone at any time for pretty much any reason. Most professionals will use the "rule of thumb" of giving two weeks notice, but this isn't universal. As such, employers generally expect employees to start in a couple of weeks. That said, contracts with longer notice periods are becoming more popular, particularly in professional or skilled roles.

In the UK, a month is fairly standard for all roles, and in professional roles it is not uncommon to see 3 month notice periods, while 6 months is not unheard of for managerial positions. Alternately notice periods may increase with service: for example my own is 1 month, rising to 2 and 3 months in my second and third year of service. As such, employers generally expect at least a month's notice period for a skilled worker.

Other countries vary by similar amounts, and it will often depend on the industry you work in. Retail and unskilled jobs tend to have shorter periods. Managerial or director roles (CEO, CTO etc) will usually involve longer periods.

Do they consider also people who are applying even when they are still employed?

Of course. In most western countries, over 80% of the eligible workforce is in employment, and most people will not leave their current job while looking for another: we all have bills to pay, after all! It is not just acceptable, it is usually expected that most job hunters will be currently employed.

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