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I'm a student at a Canadian university. I am planning on moving to the US. I'm looking for part-time and full-time jobs right now in the US. My question is, is it okay for me to use a Canadian cell phone number (I have a US address) as my phone number on my resume?

Or is it best if I get a US number and put a US number on my resume (which may be a bit of an inconvenience for me right now)?

Edit: My main issue was that it will be a long distance call for HR to contact me and HR might think that since I have a Canadian number (and the university I attend is a Canadian University) then I might require a sponsorship to work for the company (which isn't true as I have a Green Card, but HR might think otherwise).

  • This is really a work-visa/resume/interview question in disguise. "Canadian applying to US, should I state on resume that I'm a Green Card holder, and is my CA phone number undesirable?". It's not really about telephone numbers or the cost of a long-distance interview call. Tagged visa – smci Nov 7 '16 at 10:46
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is it okay for me to use a Canadian cell phone number (I have a US address) as my phone number on my resume?

It's perfectly okay to use a Canadian cell phone number. Calling Canada from the US is not at all out of the ordinary.

There's no need to get a new number for your job search, unless you don't want people to know your cell number (for some reason).

You might wish to mention in your cover letter than you plan to move to the US, although it's unlikely to be asked, since you indicate you already use a US address.

  • 1
    Okay thanks. My main issue was that it will be a long distance call for HR to contact me and HR might think that since I have a Canadian number (and the university I attend is a Canadian University) then I might require a sponsorship to work for the company (which isn't true as I have a Green Card, but HR might think otherwise). I will mention on my cover letter what my plans are. I'll wait to see if there are other replies and if not, I'll mark this answer as correct. – user112321123 Aug 25 '15 at 1:08
  • @user112321123 It's not quite the same question, but this answer may be of help: workplace.stackexchange.com/a/12670/345 – Dan Neely Aug 25 '15 at 2:52
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Yes, it's OK for you to use a Canadian phone number, like Mr. Strazzere said in his answer.

People often move around for jobs in the U.S and many have national mobile carriers, so they can end up living/working in an area where their phone number's area code might be different or "foreign." Most people won't care or actually bother to look up where that number if from as long as you're reachable... (i.e calling your Canadian phone is not "long distance" for that company/person)

I would add, though, that if I were you, (or if you wanna blend in with the local phone numbers...) I'd just sign up for a free google voice number with a US area code to forward calls to your Canadian one See Update I actually use a google voice number on my resume because even in the event that I am not reachable due to being outside the US, google voice can take a voicemail, transcribe it, and notify me that someone tried to call me. And I can even return the call using that number, via VOIP, from abroad. For me, it's a good way to never miss an important call IMO.

Update: Apparently Google Voice does not forward to Canadian numbers. It only lets you VOIP to Canada.

  • Welcome to the site and thanks for submitting a great first answer, +1. I've seen Google Voice recommended very often for job searchers for exactly these reasons. – Lilienthal Aug 25 '15 at 10:33
  • Google Voice transcriptions often have good entertainment value, too. I've yet to see one that was better than 80% correct. – alroc Aug 25 '15 at 13:12
  • @alroc True the accuracy can vary wildy due to accents. I always get a kick reading the transcripts when my doctor's Vietnamese secretary leaves me voicemails ;) – cunninglinguist Aug 25 '15 at 17:36
  • @cunninglinguist Google Voice looks like a good idea, thanks for suggesting it. I'll look into it. On a side note, my Canadian number will probably be long distance for companies in US. – user112321123 Aug 25 '15 at 23:40
  • @cunninglinguist unfortunately, I just searched and it said that Google Voice does not forward to Canadian numbers :/. Additionally, as mentioned earlier, my Canadian number will also probably be long distance since HR will be calling from US. – user112321123 Aug 26 '15 at 0:07
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I agree it's no big deal to call Canada especially in the bordering states.

One thing I'd like to add is that perhaps you should articulate that you're already in the USA. This way the employer will know right away you're actually in the USA and not looking to relocate. When they see the number they might not see that you're already in the US. They might think you're looking for relocation help as well.

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The phone number on the resume is jut one way to contact you. In many cases the key information, other than a phone interview, will be done via email.

My main issue was that it will be a long distance call for HR to contact me and HR might think that since I have a Canadian number (and the university I attend is a Canadian University) then I might require a sponsorship to work for the company (which isn't true as I have a Green Card, but HR might think otherwise).

The issue for many employers in your situation will be the mixed info on the resume:

  • Canadian Phone number
  • Currently residing in Canada (at a Canadian University)
  • United States address.

But you don't make clear on your resume/cover letter your citizenship, or your status regarding a work visa.

You must make it clear what your status is. If the company is not prepared to hire a foreigner because of the paperwork issues, then they will disregard your resume even before contacting you. Which is a pity because the issue can be easily avoided.

A non-US number isn't an issue. US citizens do go out of the country for school. Other US citizens do reside for a variety of reasons outside the Unites States.

The purpose of the resume is to convince the company that you meet their qualifications for the job. When they are done reading it they shouldn't wonder if you are even eligible to work.

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