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I'm nearing the end of my summer internship, and I've read that writing thank-you notes is a good way to maintain relationships, and just end the internship on a positive note in general.

Is this something that I should do, or will it be cheesy? Is a thank-you email too impersonal? I don't even know what a thank-you note consist of...do I go full on with a card and envelope, or something smaller?

I'd like to hear some insight from people with experience in this.

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    Does this answer what you are looking for? workplace.stackexchange.com/q/25915/2322 – enderland Aug 26 '15 at 18:16
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    It's really, completely, totally, trivially up to you. What's "cheesy" to one person could be poetry to another, or genius, or basic manners. When in doubt, do it in person. – Air Aug 26 '15 at 18:17
  • Aged 14 I did "work experience", which is what the UK calls a two-week internship for children, at a solicitor's office. They had a thank-you letter from a pupil at my school who'd done the same thing there the previous year, pinned on a noticeboard on the wall. So yeah, these things may be greatly appreciated. Downside was, I couldn't use the form letter that the school gave us in our work experience advice booklet, because they'd already got one... – Steve Jessop Apr 14 '16 at 22:46
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Is this something that I should do, or will it be cheesy? Is a thank-you email too impersonal? I don't even know what a thank-you note consist of...do I go full on with a card and envelope, or something smaller?

It won't be cheesy at all, and if sincere, will be remembered and appreciated.

Over the years, I hired many interns. On their final week, I took them out to lunch to talk about their experiences, ask them for suggestions on what I could do better for future interns, and to thank them for their hard work. Usually, they thanked me in person as well.

Some of the interns sent a follow-up letter thanking me for the opportunity, mentioning how much they had learned, and hinting that they would be amenable to a full-time job once they graduated. On several of those occasions, I took the up on the offer and did hire them when they became available.

The specific format wasn't very important - sometimes it was a thank you card, other times a handwritten letter, sometimes just an email. Far more important was the contents. A sincere thank you goes a long way.

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