3

I'm talking about this: https://www.lpi.org/3-in-1-advantage-take-two/

So apparently the are 3 Linux certification vendors (Comptia, LPI, and SUSE) that are issuing identical exams (the LPI curriculum). If you complete one of them first and jump threw a few hoops you can acquire all three.

Would it be silly to include three exams on a resume? I'm thinking it might help crawlers find you in a sea of other resumes, but I'd also be worried it would looks dumb to list essentially the same certification three times which is like saying "look I have 3 Linux certifications!".

I'm not asking about the viability of listing certifications on a resume in general just about this specific case.

  • Yes you would. Each vendor validates and issues you their own branded (for lack of a better term) certification. – user1028270 Sep 2 '15 at 19:38
12

It's probably worth listing them all. If your certifications are beneficial, it's likely that recruiters will be doing keyword searches so having all three on would be beneficial. You may want to list them together both to economize on space and to show that you're not trying to claim three meaningfully different certifications. For example,

Certifications
 - Something something
 - CompTIA Linux+ (plus LPI LPIC-1 and SUSE Certified Linux Administrator (CLA))
 - Something else...
  • 1
    If you wanted to benefit from keywords, but didn't want to actually go through the extra expense (financially) and the acknowledged silliness of getting three equivalent certifications, maybe an alternative would be to get the one certificate, list it clearly and then mention in this section something like "equivalent to SUSE Certified Linux Administrator, etc." Just make it clear which one you actually hold. – Brandin Sep 7 '15 at 8:40
  • 2
    @Brandin - That seems a bit "hinkey", though, if you look through the page. Some of the certification vendors recognize the others but it's not completely reciprocal. So the LPI LPIC-1 cert doesn't get you the Linux+ cert though the latter does get you the former (assuming you check the right boxes). I'd use "similar to" rather than "equivalent to" if you had one of the certs but not the other two. – Justin Cave Sep 7 '15 at 9:32

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