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I'm a bit stuck if I should put some software listings on my CV under the skills subheading.

For instance:

Adobe Suite I can probably doodle up a half-decent brochure or leaflet in Adobe Illustrator, but haven't used it in at least two years so there might be a few hours before I get up to full speed.

SQL Have set up databases and tables in the past integrated with Python and PHP backends. I have a fair grip on the fundamentals, but by no means high-end or professional.


  1. How much do I need to know to put it on the CV? Should I list the stuff for the sake of demonstrating flexibility and versatility, even though it won't be high-level work at least for the first hours or days?
  2. I could add 'disclaimers', like (60%) or (3/5) next to each one, but that seems tedious and somewhat unrepresentative perhaps, especially comparing what I could do in the first 10 minutes or if I got a week to get up to speed again. Also seems a bit negative.

Most projects done with these are informal, so I can't really elaborate greatly and/or link to GitHub repos or something.


Background: Central/ Western Europe, Intern, Engineering.

5

How much do I need to know to put it on the CV? Should I list the stuff for the sake of demonstrating flexibility and versatility, even though it won't be high-level work at least for the first hours or days?

To me, your current knowledge level is sufficient to include these skills on your CV. Quite often, interns aren't expected to be experts in many skills. And certainly the first few hours of an internship aren't expected to be full-production time.

I could add 'disclaimers', like (60%) or (3/5) next to each one, but that seems tedious and somewhat unrepresentative perhaps, especially comparing what I could do in the first 10 minutes or if I got a week to get up to speed again. Also seems a bit negative.

While some suggest indicating a level of expertise next to each skill (Novice, Expert, etc), I find that unnecessary.

You do need to be ready to explain the depth of your knowledge of the skills you have listed when asked. And if the particular position demands depth in one of these skills you may be asked to demonstrate them (sometimes through answering questions, sometimes on a whiteboard, etc).

When asked, don't lie or exaggerate. But prepare ahead of time as best you can. Think of it as "cramming for a test" so that you can show yourself in your best light.

1

Don't go into too much detail on your skill level (5/10 for example) - It's too subjective and complicates things

Add something to your CV if you are confident that you can talk about it in interview and do a job involving that skill. That's it, nothing complicated. Your experience in the workplace (or lack of it) should be clear on your CV, and any competent recruiter will be able to decipher that: eg if you state Illustrator on your CV they will assume you can use it, but won't expect you to be an expert unless you have several roles on your CV which mention it, adding up to a few years experience. If they're in doubt they'll likely ask you about it at interview. In short, if you're generally at a junior, inexperienced level, they will expect any skills to be at roughly that level.

And don't worry about a few hours - we all get rusty. If it takes you a morning or even a day or two to start getting back up to speed, that happens. Even taking a week or two to get into something more complex can be fine... The point is that you can do it and will just be getting back into old habits (and learning those aspects which have changed recent)

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This works well: Comfortable languages/environments: ..., Other languages/environments I enjoy: ... Make sure you can answer 90% of the questions about the comfortable bracket and 30-50% of the enjoyable ones. Also gives definition to the ones you are learning and why you're learning them, whilst providing a solid view that you know your comfortable areas.

I.e. if you want a job in C++, but also have experience with Java. C++ is comfortable, Java is enjoyable.

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