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I've recently resigned from my job, due to a scheduling conflict. I've worked there for a year. I'm currently looking for another job but I'm wondering if it's a good idea to put this job on my resume. Isn't resigning the same as quitting?

However, If I did quit a job, I definitely wouldn't put it on my resume because it will make you look bad, and the new employer may think you will quit that job.

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    A scheduling conflict? Can you elaborate on that. – Stephan Branczyk Sep 13 '15 at 17:13
  • I was hired under specific hours, Monday-Friday, it changed by adding in Sat and Sun and having Monday and Tuesday off, with the hours they changed it to was difficult to work around. I was told that this positions hours and days will not change...it changed! My employment contract even states it. @StephanBranczyk – LOSTinNEWYORK Sep 13 '15 at 19:53
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    Then, I would put the position on the resume. For an HR person, it's a red flag, sure, but it's one that you can give a perfectly good explanation to. On the other hand, leaving a one year long gap with no job on your resume can be a red flag too. So between those two potential red flags, I'd pick the first if I were you. – Stephan Branczyk Sep 13 '15 at 20:50
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    Having a one year job that you left because of a scheduling conflict will look far better than a one year gap in employment. Keep the job on your resume and figure out how to convince prospective employers that you won't be skipping out on them. – Francine DeGrood Taylor Sep 14 '15 at 17:19
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Im currently looking for another job but I'm wondering if its a good idea to put this job on my resume. Isn't resigning the same as quitting?

Yes, resigning is the same as quitting.

Hopefully, you at least resigned professionally, gave appropriate notice before leaving, etc - and didn't just say "I quit" and walk off.

However, If I did quit a job, I definitely wouldn't put it on my resume because it will make you look bad, and the new employer may think you will quit that job.

If you omit the job from your resume, you'll need to explain the one-year gap.

If you lie and are caught, you'll severely reduce your chances of getting the job. And if the lie is caught after you are hired, you could be dismissed.

While quitting a 1-year job might look bad (particularly with no new job waiting), lying is worse in many cases. As a hiring manager, I'd feel far more favorable toward someone who told me that they quit and why, than I would if I caught them lying. And in your case, you seem to have a decent reason for quitting.

Do a quick search here, and you'll find many questions and answers about omitting jobs from your resume, such as this one: What are the risks of omitting short-term employment when applying for positions?

In the future, consider finding your next job before resigning from your current job. That's what many folks would consider the professional way to do things. And it won't make you look bad.

  • While my self interest tells me to wait until I have a replacement job before resigning, I don't see why my current or future employers would care either way. Wouldn't they be more concerned about notice periods and finding/training replacement staff. – Kelly Thomas Sep 14 '15 at 11:23
  • This answer seems to cover it, but you will be asked why you quit, so just have a valid answer ready for when you're asked why you left that does not suggest anything negative about you or the company you worked for. – colmde Sep 14 '15 at 22:51
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    There're many valid and good reasons to quit, e.g. health, family, career goals, relocation, political, to list a few. I can't see why quitting after one year is bad without asking the reason. – mandy Sep 15 '15 at 13:24

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