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This question already has an answer here:

I started working at a company that made products for 3 different business areas, let's call it as company A.

After a little more than a year after I started, the company rebranded (not sure if this is the right term) the area I worked in, changed all the logos to the new brand and told every employer on that area to update their linkedIns to reflect the new brand, as if it was a different company, let's call this as company B.

About three months later, company B was sold to another company, company C, which killed the brand "company B".

During all those transitions, nothing changed about my work. I still work with the same team, developing the same products, with the same processes. However, given the small time frame between the changes (1 year, 3 months) I don't know how to put this on my resume. I'm afraid I might look like a job hopper at first glance if I put as 3 separate companies and saying i just worked for company C the whole time isn't quite right either.

marked as duplicate by scaaahu, gnat, Alec, mcknz, nvoigt Oct 5 '15 at 13:40

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Just put the current name in your CV, and then the old names following.

eg:

Company C (formerly Company A, Company B)

That will get rid of the job hopping perception and accurately portray the name changes.

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    +1, but one caveat. If you are sending resumes to similar companies where one company might have more recognition than the others, list that one first. – Keltari Sep 24 '15 at 1:04
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    @Keltari Best to put what its current name is as that is who they'll contact for reference checks. – Jane S Sep 24 '15 at 1:05
  • not necessarily. Since references are often provided separately from the resume, you can provide them the current company and state they now own the former company. Thats how I do it for the companies I work for that were bought out and there hasnt been issues. – Keltari Sep 24 '15 at 1:09
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    The key to avoid shopping perception is to list this as one job, since it was. I have numerous jobs in my CV with companies that don't exist anymore, it makes verification a bit tough sometimes, but I don't go back changing company names. – Bill Leeper Sep 24 '15 at 14:56
  • Same as Bill, I worked for the company when they were called X, I'm not going to change that to Y just because they had a name change. Landed me a job once in fact, when I applied to a company run by half a dozen oldtimers who'd worked at once such company (but in other departments) at the same time as me and liked to hire former employees of them. – jwenting Jul 4 '18 at 13:14
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This looks perfectly fine to me:

2014-2015 Company A, renamed company B (2015), Sold to Company C (2015)

... description of your work

Leave out the intermediate dates if you want to. If it was all one job/role there's no need to break it out as 3 line items.

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First, list all your experience with the particular role/title highlighted for each position, then list the company name(s) under the title, and then list responsibilities and skills/projects.

People care more about what you did rather than where you did it (unless you were at Google or Facebook, there's a good chance that nobody even knows who TechBusinessLocal is).

For the particular case of merging and renaming:

Job title - Jan 2014 to July 2015

Current business name (formerly previous business name, formerly original business name)

  • Worked with xyz software to achieve abc outcome

If they want to get references, then they have to talk to the current business since the previous ones are no longer there. It also covers the situation where they could say "but 'current business name'" didn't do that until six months ago, so how could you have been there doing that?

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