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To say Im burned out is an understatement, I just can't do my job anymore, its that bad. I even find myself doing side-projects at work since I just can't get to my job anymore. The way I got to this state is that I work at a company where the management team constantly demand more, and more, and more productivity and Im just unable to even meet the previous demands for more productivity. I don't see the current company going anywhere, nor do I see me putting in extra time/effort actually changing the fate of the company. Im wondering how exactly can I handle being burned out and move to a more normal state.

closed as off-topic by Lilienthal, IDrinkandIKnowThings, Kate Gregory, gnat, scaaahu Oct 15 '15 at 3:29

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    If you see no future with the company, then start looking for a new one that won't be so demanding. – David K Oct 8 '15 at 15:55
  • How about a vacation ? Maybe 2 weeks off will be enough for a mental restart... – Radu Murzea Oct 14 '15 at 19:35
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I have had success in combating burnout by trying to take greater ownership over what I'm doing.

You say you are doing side projects. Have you considered trying for a change in job description so that you can make those the focus of your employment?

You dont say what you actually do, so I dont know how feasible it is to start trying to get ahead of your management and create your own processes and practices that will enhance your productivity, but that's what worked for me.

For a while I was a refund processor. The production and accuracy quotas were insane. The job drove me insane trying to keep up with the pace. After treading water and just barely getting buy for a few months, I dug deep, figured out a streamlined process, and then started teaching myself Selenium so that I could automate my streamlined process.

By doing that, I turned the tables, and instead of being on the business end of the whip, I turned it around and started challenging my management to streamline their processes to keep up with mine, since their process for generating files couldn't feed me file quick enough to keep my workday filled.

This got me promoted to an Analyst position in a higher tier department.

edit: though if:

nor do I see me putting in extra time/effort actually changing the fate of the company.

Then what I just said, you've already ruled that approach out, and I dont see any other answer than "start sending your resume out".

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Sometimes this happens in work, although you might love the role still, feeling tired or bored of a specific business isn't uncommon.

I just can't do my job anymore, its that bad. I even find myself doing side-projects at work

This isn't a good thing. If you can't do your job and are doing side projects that might not be related to the business you're a detriment to the business itself. This is bad for the company because they're paying someone who isn't dedicating the hours to push the company forward and bad for you if you want a good reference from them.

The way I got to this state is that I work at a company where the management team constantly demand more

Have you tried talking to your management about this first? If they don't know that you're feeling overworked and that you can't handle the pressure they're putting on you, what can the possibly be expected to do about it?

I don't see the current company going anywhere, nor do I see me putting in extra time/effort actually changing the fate of the company

Seems as though you're implying you've hit a brick wall with your current role. Again, this isn't uncommon feeling but once you're feeling this demotivated, typically it's worth considering looking for a new job.

In the meantime however, not doing your job and distracting yourself with unrelated projects, from a business perspective isn't acceptable which is why, whilst you're looking, you need to be motivated before you either get fired or get a poor reference.

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    Yes, stop doing personal projects at work. This is something that should not be done under any circumstances no matter how unhappy you are unless the company has specifically given time for personal projects.You are being paid, be an adult and do your job until you find something else. Don't think you have to be "motivated" to do you job, that is unrealistic.You don't have to be happy to do your job either, you have to be responsible enough that you understand they are paying you and are obligated to do your job or return your paycheck. – HLGEM Oct 8 '15 at 19:36
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Have you ever considered talking to someone about this? Try and bring up this topic to the HR.

Explain how you feel, that you the demands get bigger and bigger, which it leads you to a burnout and see how you this will turn out.

If your company is a serious company, the situation will change. Regularly they ought to cut you some slack. Maybe they could even present you a new approach to your current work which will help you get back on track.

If not, you can always look for something new.

However, avoid to reveal your personal thoughts about the direction that the company is taking or that you are doing side projects, which is definitely not optimal.

Finally, try and leave the job issues in the company building, where they belong. Do not let them to get to you. This is how jobs are running.

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I even find myself doing side-projects at work since I just can't get to my job anymore.

Stop doing that ASAP. It is not good or even ethical to do side-projects at work, when you have to be doing work for your company.

I don't see the current company going anywhere, nor do I see me putting in extra time/effort actually changing the fate of the company

Yes, that's a very dominating sign of a burnout. So, you would want to meet your manager/senior and talk about the situation and listen to what he/she says. (One of my colleagus have combated burnout in this way. She talked with the manager, and had a project change for herself and now she's happily working off with her current team.)

If your situation remains as is, even after talking to him, then you might want to re-consider your future at the company.

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