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I am leaving my company and I am throwing a farewell party. It appears that there is no problem from the culture of my company, but I am wondering if it is a good idea to pay for my own going away party (ie, buying pizza). I would like to leave on good terms, with my coworkers and employer, would this be a good idea?

closed as off-topic by Jim G., gnat, GreenMatt, Jenny D, scaaahu Oct 13 '15 at 9:39

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  • 2
    Ummm, sure? Why would you think that you couldn't buy pizza for the team? It would be more normal for the team to throw a farewell party for the departing individual. But nothing says you can't have two farewells and no one has ever complained about someone offering them free pizza. – Justin Cave Oct 8 '15 at 22:44
  • Ask your manager -- the custom may be that they buy -- but generally there's no problem if you want to feed the group. – keshlam Oct 8 '15 at 22:45
  • Sound good. I instead buy a flower for all my coworkers the day I end my intership. Different color diferent meaning. – Juan Carlos Oropeza Oct 8 '15 at 22:45
  • What country are you in? Here's nearly the same question: workplace.stackexchange.com/q/46276/2322 – enderland Oct 8 '15 at 22:58
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I think it would be a lovely gesture. You see, it's not too often that the departing worker buys the cupcakes or pizza. Usually the manager buys it for the departing employee. But in this case, it'd work out Ok if you had pizza + more.

So you'd get brownie points. It could possibly lead to some future gains, also.

So yes. Pizza is good.

  • 2
    I'd definitely agree with this - it's not about the reference (as suggested in another answer, it's about saying thank you to your team, and they'll likely give you a leaving gift anyway... so you'll probably break even. It won't necessarily have any major gain, but it's nice to leave as friends and it may mean you're remembered more strongly in the minds of co-workers: say if they're asked if they know any other whatever job you have's – Jon Story Oct 9 '15 at 14:24
  • +1, however check with your HR director first. You never know what there policies are. – Keltari Oct 10 '15 at 0:01
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Definitely

In case, your co-workers are coders, then they would remember you for life. (If you add coffee in the treats list, then you've struck the chord there!)

If not, then still you would be remembered, everyone loves pizza.

On a serious note, I would also advise you to have a nice talk(about anything) with all of them before you leave, so that they would be happy to come forward to offer help in the future (or maybe future gains too like @Adel wrote).

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I'm going to go against the grain here and say this sounds horrible. If you have to "buy" (so to speak) your way to get good references then there is a serious problem here. What I think is going on here is that you're excited to leave and you're not thinking straight. My advice is if this costs you more than 25 dollars, I would pass as it seems a bit too excessive just to get a reference.

  • 3
    I think you're missing the point. The OP isn't suggesting that they have to do this in order to get a reference, they're asking if it's culturally accepted generally. – Jon Story Oct 9 '15 at 14:22

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