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I am an Engineering student and domain is Electronics and communications Engineering.As i am in final year of my course there are interview in which software company recruiter's ask me the question like "Why are you coming to software field while you have done your course in ECE"

For this what should be my answer and What recruiter expect from me?

closed as off-topic by alroc, gnat, scaaahu, Jenny D, Lilienthal Oct 14 '15 at 10:24

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Best answer is just honesty. Why are you in software is a very valid question for several reasons. One, it gives the recruiter a chance to get a feel for what sort of skill sets you have and what you would be suited to and two it shows you are dedicated/interested in the work you do and not just doing it for the sake of having any old job.

there are many options you could say of course, I wont think of them all but here are examples

- I like to work with electronic components

- I like to build something worthwhile

- I desire to learn as much as I can about technology to stay current in the world events

- I find it appealing/interesting to do this. It is my passion.

- I like the options of a career working in the IT sector over other sectors

- I couldn't see myself finding anything else as interesting as this field

and don't forget to back your questions up with something like "because of my interest in XYZ" so for example

- I like the options of a career working in the IT sector over other sectors **(now back it up)** because the many fields one can get experience in are always expanding and I like to stay current on technology.

But please remember, be honest. You will talk more about anything if you are honest, you will be more relaxed and the whole process will be much easier this way for you.

Best of luck

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For this what should be my answer and What recruiter expect from me?

There likely is no correct answer. The recruiter expects you to have a reason why you did it. It may be trivial like "because it was more fun" or more complicated.

Any reason is a good reason, there is no right or wrong here. Explain it. The only wrong answer would be "I don't know, it just happened." Recruiters like people that know what they want.

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I am an engineer and worked all my life in software development. Basically in my experience having what I could arguably call a "real" engineering degree helped me tremendously in the software industry. I have a good grasp of math, product development, and I did have enough software development courses to get me started. Also, most of what you need to learn to do development is not taught on CS courses anyways so you are not any less competent than a CS grad.

Getting a Masters in MIS or CS can help as well, actually that would be the greatest combinations of credentials IMO. Good luck.

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I had a similar experience during an interview of mine. (I have managed to crack it, so I thought my experience might be useful to you.)

I am from a non-CS background and I am interviewing for a Data Science Engineer position (which involves building the analytics architecture)

So, this was my response to the question:

My passion always was to become a data science engineer. Although I come from a non-CS background, I have taken the help of online resources and courses to work my way through the concepts. And as it is my dream to become one, I am positive that I would learn the concepts very fast, and get going with the team quickly.

This answer is only valid if you have put enough efforts for your desired career, and have a convincing reason behind the change.

Else, prove your CS skills through any projects you have done as part of your coursework(if any).

Telling the interviewer that you want to make the switch just because there are nice opportunities in CS, wouldn't help(<-- This also comes from an interview experience of a friend).

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