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Long story short (remember that since that's not the point this is a summary that lacks an explanation for my reasons or detail on what happened, so please go easy on me), I left sick for a while without properly communicating when I would come back, then came back to my office and resigned with no previous notice.

There is an explanation but that's not the point of this thread, although I feel that it's not justified anyway and I feel bad about it. My manager did mention that he was pissed off.

It should be noted that it was a summer internship that was also my first job.

I feel bad about it because it was a nice tech company with a focus on quality that taught me a lot.

I'm also very concerned about potential bad reviews from them, which is something I'd like to take care of if I can.

The point of this thread is that I need advice on whether it's sensible to send a late apology email now, something along the lines of "Hey, I'm very sorry I behaved that way in the end because I was a newbie and didn't really know how to handle certain situations. I feel that I behaved in an unprofessional way and I sincerely apologize. I'm very grateful for the time we worked together and all I learned with you guys." or something like that.

One argument against it is that a friend mentioned that doing that would give them written proof that I did behave poorly and make things worse. I dont know to what extent does that outweight the potential advantages of making things right.

marked as duplicate by Kent A., scaaahu, Joe Strazzere, NotVonKaiser, gnat Oct 18 '15 at 16:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Who would you be considering sending an email to? Your former supervisor, co-workers, or their HR? – CGCampbell Oct 17 '15 at 23:55
  • @CGCampbell To my former supervisor – Windbeutel HD Oct 17 '15 at 23:56
  • @KentAnderson That one is very similar and has a lot of useful answers, but it doesn't cover the possibility of bad reviews and the effect of this on it. – Windbeutel HD Oct 17 '15 at 23:57
  • Why are you concerned about "potential bad reviews" from them? Don't you have an NDA in place? (I'm being facetious...I assume you don't have an NDA?? ..and that's why you're worried?) – K. Alan Bates Apr 8 '16 at 18:44
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It is a possibility that putting an apology in writing can come back to haunt you but why not make a phone call to your former supervisor? A phone call can't be put into a file but it can make a positive impression that may come in mind when the supervisor is asked for a review/referral of you.

  • This is a good call, and, as you say, making a possitive impression that comes in mind when the supervisor is asked for a review is exactly what I want, however, I'm not so sure about a call, I mean, he could be in the middle of something and it's not that important... I guess it would probably be kinda awkward – Windbeutel HD Oct 18 '15 at 15:38
  • I think you're feeling a little insecure/awkward about actually speaking with the person because of the way you left. If he's busy, he'll let the call go to voice mail or will make it a quick conversation. Either way, you will have made the effort to leave a better impression of yourself with your old employer. I think it will go much better than you anticipate. – pakathy58 Oct 18 '15 at 16:40
  • "A phone call can't be put into a file" This is simply not true. Depending on location, recording Phone calls is not only legal but often encouraged. – Weckar E. Jul 12 '17 at 9:02
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I think your friend is right, do not put this in writing, put it down to experience and move forwards. Whether you apologise or not in theory you will still get a bad review, you earned a bad review. But it's your first job and you can learn and grow from that without too much problems further down the track.

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