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I worked for a large corporation, I left that corporation on good terms. About 2 months after I left the company I received an email saying that I have been over paid for two weeks worth of salary they also sent me a breakdown of my payments for the last year. Personally I don't see this over-payment they keep telling me because my check before the over-payment was $0 then the next pay period I received the amount I expected as final pay. It makes no sense that I would received over-payment after this. I think they shorted me on my check before the payment, and I have asked them why. Now they are bugging me to pay back money. The company sent me a letter in the mail about the over-payment with one amount in the letter but in emails I have gotten 2 different amounts.

I am not sure of the right way to address this problem. How can I properly respond to their demands to pay back money that I do not believe is over-payment?

marked as duplicate by NotMe, mcknz, scaaahu, Jane S Oct 20 '15 at 5:29

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    Similar to this question: workplace.stackexchange.com/questions/34471/… – David K Oct 19 '15 at 14:47
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    Have your lawyer ask them for proof of overpayment. – Myles Oct 19 '15 at 15:20
  • The fact that they're asking for payment via e-mail is questionable, as pointed out in the other similar question. Your previous employer should know your mailing address and should contact you by that means for this sort of thing. At that point you can react. - I see you say you've gotten emails as well as a letter. Just consider the letter, ignore the emails (consider them as spam). – Brandin Oct 20 '15 at 10:56
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I am not sure of the right way to address this problem. How can I properly respond to their demands to pay back money that I do not believe is over-payment?

If the amounts are small and you don't think they would spend much time/money to recoup what they think they are owed, you could just ignore them. Your assumption would be that they won't bother to hire a lawyer or go to court.

If you want to take the high road, you could bring your notes and check stubs and pay them a visit. Go to Payroll and determine how their conclusions differ from yours, then (if you eventually agree that you owe them some money) make it right.

If the amounts are large enough, and you cannot reach an agreement, you may want to involve your lawyer.

At least in my locale, you are not entitled to keep such an over-payment (if one actually occurred). Laws may differ in your locale.

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