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I had an offer from company A and another offer from company B offering +5k. Since I was more interested in A I asked them to match B's offer. They didn't and I had to reject their offer. Since then I had plenty of time to dig a bit more into what B is doing and further consider the situation and I feel that I made a big mistake, since career-wise A is going to be much better.

Is there any way to recall the offer rejection and accept the job (it has been two weeks since I rejected it)? I wouldn't mind if I had to interview again, but I am just worried that HR might consider it a red flag or something.

Edit: I got the job!

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    This is why "following the money" is not a good idea. My advice would be to deal with the bad job for a while and keep looking. – Lawrence Aiello Oct 20 '15 at 14:47
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    You could just ask them if the offer still stands. What do you have to loose? – nikie Oct 20 '15 at 19:11
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    Be prepared for them to reject you this round. You display signs of someone who will leave as soon as a better offer comes around. – SnakeDoc Oct 20 '15 at 21:07
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    At two weeks since you rejected it, it's highly likely they have already filled the role with another candidate by now. But it never hurts to ask, all they can say is no. – Jane S Oct 20 '15 at 21:37
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    If you do this, remember you are giving them a new piece of information about yourself. They might conclude you are a money-grabber with no real interest in the actual job, or that you are disorganized, or just indecisive. Any of those things might make them reconsider re-opening their earlier offer, even if the job is still unfilled. – alephzero Oct 21 '15 at 0:43
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Is there any way to recall the offer rejection and accept the job (it has been two weeks since I rejected it)? I wouldn't mind if I had to interview again, but I am just worried that the HR might consider it a red flag or something.

There's nothing automatic here (you cannot "recall" an offer rejection and assume that you will be hired), but anything is possible.

Since it's only been 2 weeks, call whoever offered the job immediately. Tell them you have thought through their offer more fully and would like to change your mind and accept it. Then see where it goes from there.

You have nothing at all to lose. They could hire you right away, ask you to come in and talk more, or indicate that they have moved on.

It is a bit of a red flag. Be prepared to discuss fully what led you to reject their offer initially, and why you now want to accept it. Certainly they will be wary. You will need to be able to calm their fears.

If you do this well, you could even be considered for a future position, if this one has already been filled.

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    +1 for "Be prepared to discuss fully what led you to reject their offer initially, and why you now want to accept it. Certainly they will be wary." You will have to be honest with them. The extra money doesn't make you a mercenary, it is human nature to veer toward the higher remuneration to begin with and if there were timescales involved, you presumably acted accordingly. Your only "mistake" here is acting slightly in haste – Mike Oct 20 '15 at 14:59
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    @Mike it's quite easy for him: I had another offer and after some research it was clear for me that it's not a good option / I had another offer and after some research I was impressed by your company results in the field x. – Silviu Burcea Oct 20 '15 at 19:40
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    @JoeStrazzere It's not always easy to research in a short time. The Internet gives you the info, but sometimes, you'll have a hard time digging for this info. There are moments in life when you have to pick the best at a given time, without knowing everything that would, otherwise, affect your choice. – Silviu Burcea Oct 21 '15 at 6:46
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If they saw you as the only person that they wanted to hire, and they still have the need, then it can't hurt to approach them.

But if they had other viable candidates, then they reached out to their second choice right after you rejected the offer. In fact, it is possible that that other person has already started work. They could have even decided to go in another direction and no longer need somebody like you to fill the position.

When you reject an offer, or let an offer expire, you should realize that they will move on to Plan B.

Contacting them won't hurt, just don't get your hopes up. Reapplying to another job opening is also a possibility.

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You have likely missed your chance.

When a candidate declines an offer, the next call placed by the hiring manager is to the second placed candidate, who is likely to have accepted (if not then to the third best etc.)

The only way the hiring company will consider making you the offer again is if they have exhausted their short list (unlikely) or they really want you to join alongside the other selected candidate (unlikely due to budget constraints).

  • This isn't always true, particularly among companies who have regular vacancies - we don't, for developers; if the second best person isn't up to our standard we keep the post vacant and wait for more applications; if someone great rethinks, we'll make room for them. It's always worth an ask. – Julia Hayward Feb 14 '17 at 19:37

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