2

Both work are outsorcing projects (i.e. my de facto and de jure employers differ).

On my contract, both sides can terminate in 2 weeks during the trial period (which is far to expire now).

I've contacted my current (de jure) employer, and explained him the situation. He reacted with panic.

As I see, I have a situation where moral is against the business reality. But why they didn't write a much longer termination period then?

Anyways, what to do?

P.s. if it matters: it is Germany, and I am a foreigner here, with much worser possibilities on the job market as the native Germans. If I am laid off, it can be even a half year to find a new job, while a native German finds it on the spot (at least in the IT). Thus, risking to lose a job is a very bad thing for me, but the current situation is exactly the opposite: I need the switch to a new one.

P.s.2.

When he employed me, I was an unemployed foreigner trying to desperately find a job. Maybe he underestimated my market value. Or overestimated my trustworthiness?

P.s.3.

Both job pays enough well. The second offer pays only a little bit better. Which is much important: it is a very good name on the market. My current employer is a bad name.

P.s.4: If I start to work on a new project, in the first some weeks I am much less productive. If I step out early, all what I did, will have essentially a negative worth in the project.

P.s.5.: Although it is my dilemma, the reasons, how to decide in a such case, have value in a general sense as well. What are the reasons? How to decide between moral and rationality?

3

Given you already have the job with the new employer, then from that perspective it will have little impact. Depending on how long you stay at your new position, the amount of impact that leaving the old company will have on your career will lessen.

However, it's very likely that you've burned your bridge with the first company. Also, when you say:

My current employer is a bad name.

Then you change the face of it quite a bit. If your current employer is known to not be a good company to work for, then leaving said company so quickly is not necessarily a bad thing.

However. What you could do is to offer to do some (paid) consulting to your old employer after you leave to finish handing over the work you have done. This of course entirely depends on your amount of available time and if you are prepared to spend any of it. But it is an option you may wish to explore. Otherwise, enjoy your new role and do the best you can :)

  • Thank you! It is an outsourcing project. Where I actually work, is a bad name. The company which legally employs me, hasn't really one, because it is small. And, I will burn any bridge behind me by this legal employer. It will be a very fearful thing to me, I burned once my hands in a such case (I leaved a project based on my contract terms, but "early" on the view of my employer, and this is what he says to everybody asking him about my work quality). – Gray Sheep Oct 25 '15 at 23:53
  • There's really no way around the burning of the bridge, beyond what I suggested. Either you stay under conditions that are not ideal, or you go and risk a poor reputation with them. That has to be your decision to make :) – Jane S Oct 25 '15 at 23:58
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    Thank you! What you say is so clear... and so fair... and so cruel. But you are right. 1) There is no way to not burn the bridges, and 2) it is my decision if I do this, there is no oracle to decide instead of me. – Gray Sheep Oct 26 '15 at 0:18
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    I didn't leave the company. – Gray Sheep Oct 27 '15 at 19:55
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If morals were important to your current employer, he would not have paid you a salary that is obviously way below your market value. The same as your prospective new employer is not offering you the bigger salary because he likes paying higher wages in general but because you're worth it to him.

I'm not saying this to judge your previous employer. The labor market is also just a market, everyone is trying to get a good deal out of it. And so should you.

Don't you worry about the short duration of your termination period. It's 2 weeks, and that's all the obligation you have or should think about.

  • When he employed me, I was an unemployed foreigner trying to desperately find a job. Maybe he underestimated my market value. Or overestimated my trustworthiness. – Gray Sheep Oct 25 '15 at 22:32
  • And he pays well. The second offer pays only a little bit better. Which is much important: it is a very good name on the market. My current employer is a bad name. – Gray Sheep Oct 25 '15 at 22:38
  • This site is about HR problems, not your personal mental dilemma. I told you my opinion how to look at it but you have to make the decision, and live with it. – vic Oct 25 '15 at 22:47
  • Another thing: if I start to work on a project, in the first some weeks I am much less productive. If I step out early, all what I did, will have essentially a negative worth in the project. – Gray Sheep Oct 25 '15 at 22:52
  • You are right. But: although it is my dilemma, the reasons, how to decide in a such case, have value in a general sense as well. – Gray Sheep Oct 25 '15 at 22:53

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