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I've posted some previous threads about my job being in trouble, jokes from a new colleague, helping my colleague who is double my age and less experienced and being involved in recruitment. All of these contributed to my being fired today. The reasons for my termination were stated as:

  1. Tenable working relationships
  2. Numerous unsubstantiated complaints about fellow colleagues.
  3. Failure to follow the correct channels for feeding back professional technical feedback to relevant colleagues

I recently emailed my HoD about my workload, and how my new colleague is conducting interviews, as he asked me to make some questionnaire and attach answers to it because he doesn't know what to ask or say

Another event was my colleague annoying me. I was talking to someone and he tried to get our attention in a disrespectful way, to which my other colleague replied telling him to 'shut up', that was something I mentioned to my manager as well.

As well as my being concerned over the work put on top my shoulders without any comment or good coding practice, by a colleague who is double my age and without any help.

I was handed the letter saying that I was terminated. The HR wouldn't let me go back to the office and collect my things, I was told to take a 1-week vacation as 1 week notice period, and my project manager collected all things from my table and bought them to me, and asked me to vacant premises.

Am I being victimized? Was I zoned out?

Should I make an appeal and on what ground?

closed as off-topic by mcknz, gnat, Kent A., scaaahu, Jane S Nov 4 '15 at 3:47

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27

It sounds like you and your manager don't see eye to eye on a lot of things so I do feel human resources has done the right thing here in asking you to finish your employment on the same day that they've provided you with your termination notice. They've done the right thing - they're paying you appropriately and although I feel you will disagree, I think it all has been handled quite professionally.

Ultimately - you and this company are a bad fit for each other. By the sounds of all of these threads despite your work ability you've made a bad impression quite early on with HR and management.

I think engaging a lawyer now is going to be a waste of time and resources. I would instead focus on moving past this and finding a new job. Additionally, I think in your next position you would be much better off taking the time to get the know the personalities and work environment around you before making any complaints - it's quite unsual for somebody on probation to air so many grievances (if any) and it's sounding like a large contributor to why you've had the issues that you have in this last engagement.

  • I agree with you, I might be over my head as I was stressed by amount of work being thrown at me while my other colleague had just one work, and his behaviour was offensive to me. But I learnt to be blunt when I m being victimised. Do you think I should ask for a experience certificate or they won't give me? – user15704 Nov 7 '15 at 0:05
  • @Nofel I think you should definitely ask. Direct the question at HR though - they're the least likely to not do this and the best department to do so. – Michael A Nov 7 '15 at 3:39
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You were being ostracized and made fun of by your colleagues. You were living inside your own little private hell. Be grateful that you're no longer working at this company.

One reason you were such an easy target was because you are introverted and lack English language skills. Now focus on getting another job and work on being less vulnerable.

There must be ESL classes you can take. And public speaking clubs you can join. You need to get out of your shell, and at the same time practice mixing with people who don't speak your native language. There are also lots of other social clubs/ special interests meetups you could join.

Force yourself to get out and work on those skills. I know it will feel uncomfortable at first, but you have to trust me on this, clubs and social activities will feel more comfortable the more you go to them. Myself, I am not an English native speaker, and it took me time to acclimate.

12

If you were in a probationary period, then you have few rights. Unless you were discriminated against in a way that is not allowed (race, sex, religion, etc), then they can fire you for any reason they like.

It sounds like they don't consider you a team player, and you don't fit in with their organisation. There's nothing you can do about that.

They should have an internal appeals process, should you consider it worth the effort of appealing.

  • Yes that was stated in the reason as bullet point said but restricting me from emailing head and making a issue out of it plus way they didn't let me go back and get me my stuff back is rude. – user15704 Nov 3 '15 at 23:19
  • If you can stretch the appeal process over 30 days and your then over the probation period – Pepone Nov 4 '15 at 0:09
  • 12
    "...they didn't let me go back and get me my stuff back is rude." Actually, this part is perfectly normal I'm afraid. – Stephan Branczyk Nov 4 '15 at 0:17
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Should I make a appeal or was I right to be fired?

You were right to be fired.

If you're on probation and you're complaining a lot, then they got rid of a troublesome employee as hassle free and cheaply as possible, no offence. Probation is about more than work ability, it's also about your ability to interact with their team.

Should you make an appeal? No.

They have already taken this into account and are prepared to deal with it, it will not do you any good at all.

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    Unless you were on a contract of some sort, it is nearly impossible to prove "wrongful" termination as you would need to prove they terminated you on some grounds other than your work performances. By complaining a lot, having a lot of emails back and forth complaining and raising complaints are only going to be brought out to prove that your work performance was poor. – Dan Nov 4 '15 at 19:13
  • They say the squeaky wheel gets the grease, but the nail that stands out gets the hammer. Should have squeaked and not stood out. One thing should consider is unemployment insurance. Maybe could make the case it was wrongful termination, if only for that.. Keep you going a few weeks while find another job. – Dan Shaffer Nov 17 '15 at 17:47