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Searching a bit but can't find any related information. So post my question here.

My interview passed several rounds. The last round I heard the interviewer seemingly mentioned the next step would be the final round. Then the day after the last round the recruiter emailed me with some feedback and asked me if I would like to proceed. I think I am too naive so I replied with something like 'Thanks the company for providing me the opportunity', 'I am really excited about the chance to join the company', and so on (I recheck my reply and find that I do not directly reply I would like to proceed, etc.). Would that confuse the recruiter (let him/her think I falsely thought that was the offer or passing the final round)?

If it would confuse the recruiter, should I email again? If I should email again, what messages should I convey? Or should I wait for a few days, then ask for the update?

I appreciate any advice.

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    I believe what he was asking you is if you would like to go in for the final (round of) interviews. You replied as if you were accepting the position, which does not seem like the appropriate response. If more than a couple of business days have passed contact him again asking if there is any more information about the upcoming interview. – AndreiROM Dec 4 '15 at 18:19
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I think I am too naive so I replied with something like 'Thanks the company for providing me the opportunity', 'I am really excited about the chance to join the company', and so on (I recheck my reply and find that I do not directly reply I would like to proceed, etc.). Would that confuse the recruiter (let him/her think I falsely thought that was the offer or passing the final round)?

Wait, you said:

I am really excited about the chance to join the company

This implies a desire to work for the company and thus go through whatever process it takes to get there. Expressing a want of something does open a door. If I go to a McDonald's and say, "I'm really excited about getting a Big Mac," they may infer that I'm ordering a Big Mac. The key here is implications of what you say. If you are truly excited about the chance then what you want to do is something that may be guessed for you if you stumble around the terms and do not explicitly say, "No, I don't want to continue in this process."

If it would confuse the recruiter, should I email again? If I should email again, what messages should I convey? Or should I wait for a few days, then ask for the update?

You need to be clear in your language so that there aren't poor inferences made. Saying that you are excited about the chance to join the company could be interpreted as,"Yes, I want that interview please sign me up," as it seems to be a positive direction to take things. I would call the recruiter so that you have a conversation rather than e-mail where your words may well stumble over each other as you have stated here. The key is what do you want, do you know what options are before you and can you articulate in a manner without contradiction which way to go forward here?

  • Hmm, agreed. Phone calls are better – Adel Dec 4 '15 at 18:35
  • I am not native (English) speaker so I can't be sure if my sentences would confuse the recruiter or not. This clarifies my questions. Thank you very much! – sdlee Dec 5 '15 at 9:41
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I don't think there is anything wrong with sending a simple followup like:

  • "Just to clarify - I am interested in the next steps of the interview process. I reread my previous email and noticed I did not answer that question directly. I look forward to hearing back!"

You are probably more worried about this than you need to be. But it seems like you would feel better if you knew the recruiter got a "yes" response.

  • You are right. I am too worried so that I am not sure what to do would be better (because I read on the internet some mention that it's better not to send mails twice which confused me). Thank you for the advice! I really appreciate it! – sdlee Dec 5 '15 at 9:37

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